Pastiche & Fan Fic Logo
Victoria, Tangor, 1982

Edgar Rice Burroughs' Beyond Thirty
ADAPTED FOR THE SCREEN

James D. Bozarth

EXT - STORM - NIGHT
Electrical fires and thunder combine with blown rain to create a terrible storm in which nothing can survive. Waves roll and crest in endless procession over the turbulent ocean. The view rises above the storm into a clear quiet night. Far above rides a flying submersible which has the look of dilapidation despite the fact that its brasswork glistens with polish. The camera pans past the nameplate marked by the name, COLDWATER, and zeroes in on the bridge window, through which is seen the captain JEFFERSON TURCK. 21.

TURCK: (v.o.)

Since earliest childhood I have been strangely fascinated by the mystery surrounding the history of the last days of twentieth century Europe. My interest is keenest, perhaps, not so much in relation to known facts as to speculation upon the unknowable of the two centuries that have rolled by since human intercourse between the Western and Eastern Hemispheres ceased--the mystery of Europe's state following the termination of the Great War--provided, of course, that the war had been terminated.

INT - BRIDGE - DAY
The bridge is filled with quiet activity as the camera reveals JEFFERSON TURCK. A sailor hands Turck some papers which he scans and signs, nodding the sailor away.

TURCK: (v.o.)

My name is Jefferson Turck. I am a Captain in the navy. I was born in Arizona, in the United States of North America, in the year of our Lord 2116. Therefore, I am twenty-one years old. In early boyhood the navy called to me, as did the free, wide, unpeopled spaces of the mighty oceans. And so I joined the navy, coming up from the ranks, as we all must, learning our craft as we advance. At twenty I found myself a captain in command of the aero-submarine COLDWATER, of the SS-96 class.

TURCK:

Mr. Alvarez. Status?

ALVAREZ turns from console.

ALVAREZ:

All systems nominal and true, Sir.

INT - ENGINE ROOM - NIGHT
A hand turns a valve letting a thin flow of liquid drop onto the floor, which spatters and smokes. The camera follows a figure as it walks past a valve which shows a dropping pressure. An alarm beside the valve clicks and starts ringing. DELCARTE rushes into frame, seeing the moving dial. He spins and punches the general alarm.

DELCARTE:

Emergency shut down! Taylor. Evacuate generator room one.

The leak catches fire and spreads to stacked canisters. DELCARTE sees the fire and dives for cover.

INT - BRIDGE - MORNING
The ship shudders with an explosion. Alarms ring out.

TURCK:

Alvarez. Status?

Alvarez looks up from his control panel.

ALVAREZ:

One of the screen generators has failed. Damage control is enroute.

TURCK:

(punching intercom button) Engine room. What is your status? What went wrong?

DELCARTE:

Gravitation-screen generator Number one has been damaged by an explosion of the reserve fuel. It appears to have been a leaking valve. The engine room is filled with smoke, but we appear to have suffered no other damage.

TURCK:

Very well, Mr. DELCARTE. Number two will keep us supplied. In the meantime we will send a wireless for a repair ship.

DELCARTE:

But that is the trouble, sir. Number two has been out of service for most of the voyage.

TURCK:

Do what you can, Mr. Delcarte. Turck out. Alvarez, why was I not notified we were running on only one generator?

ALVAREZ:

I did not know either. Johnson, why was this not reported to us?

No answer. They look around and do not see Johnson.

TURCK:

Where is Johnson?

Ramrod straight, PORFIRIO JOHNSON, 35, appears at the door.

JOHNSON:

I was down in Engineering, attempting to repair Number Two Generator. I knew it would come, sir. I made a report on these generators three years ago. I advised then that they both be scrapped. Their principle is entirely obsolete. They're done for. I shall at least have the satisfaction of knowing my report was accurate.

TURCK:

Have we sufficient reserve screen to permit us to make land, or, at least, meet our relief halfway?

JOHNSON:

No, sir, we are sinking now.

TURCK:

Have you anything further to report?

JOHNSON:

No, sir

TURCK:

Very good. Continue to work on the Generators. Dismissed. Alvarez, send Wireless to me!

Johnson exits. Alvarez follows.

TURCK:

Helmsman, what is the direction of the wind?

HELMSMAN:

At our current height the wind is 10 knots from the west.

TURCK:

And at the surface?

HELMSMAN:

The surface wind is blowing 60 knots from the northwest.

Alvarez leads Snider in.

SNIDER:

Sir!

TURCK:

Take a message to the secretary of the navy. Start. Have lost power from number one generator due to explosion and number two generator is out of service. With remaining screening force, I shall continue in the air, making as rapid headway toward St. Johns as possible, and when forced to take to the water I shall continue in the same direction. Position: 30 degrees East and about 52 degrees North.

SNIDER:

But, Captain, to attempt to ride out such a storm upon the surface is suicidal. The COLDWATER is not designed for surface navigation except under fair weather conditions. Submerged, or in the air, she's tractable enough in any sort of weather when under power; but without her screen generators she's almost helpless, and, if submerged, can not rise to the surface.

TURCK:

Dismissed.

Snider leaves.

ALVAREZ

He's right, you know. The COLDWATER is fit only for the junk pile; but the world-old parsimony of government has retained her in active service, and sent two hundred men to sea in her, to patrol thirty from Iceland to the Azores.

TURCK:

Still we will do our duty as best we can with what we have.

EXT - CALM SKY ABOVE STORM - DAY

The COLDWATER drops slowly toward the surface and the storm, bucking the west wind, clawing away from thirty.

INT - BRIDGE - DAY

TURCK:

All stations, prepare for weather change. We are heading into the teeth of the storm. Mr. Alvarez, sound general quarters. Maintain until further notice.

ALVAREZ:

Aye, aye, sir.

Bells ring all over the ship as the crew rush in quick order to their stations. The view over Turck's shoulder changes from brilliant sunlight into the dense vapor of clouds and on down through them to the wild, dark storm strata beneath. The waves run to tremendous heights, and the COLDWATER, not designed to meet such waves head on, bucks and rolls Snider clambers up the ladder to the bridge, and, disheveled and breathless, stands before Turck at salute.

TURCK:

Problem, Snider?

SNIDER:

The wireless, sir! My God, sir, I cannot send.

TURCK:

The emergency outfit?

SNIDER:

I have tried everything, sir. I have exhausted every resource. We cannot send.

Snider draws himself up and salutes again.

TURCK:

You may return to your post.

ALVAREZ:

It's no fault of his that the mechanism was antiquated and worthless, in common with the balance of the COLDWATER's equipment. He's the finest wireless operator in Pan-America.

TURCK:

I know, but I still don't trust him. If this storm is destined to blow us across thirty, or send us to the bottom of the ocean, no help can reach us in time to prevent it. I ordered the message sent solely because regulations require it, and not with any particular hope that we could benefit by it in our present extremity. Prepare for surface running.

JOHNSON:

Shouldn't we dive underwater?

TURCK:

Without generator power we cannot surface. Further, I do not propose to fall into the sea without screen power. We shall land facing the wind and plow into a capture wave. Helmsman, bring her about into the wind.

HELMSMAN:

Aye, aye, sir. Bringing her about to three-one-zero. Wind at 35 knots gusting to 60 knots.

EXT - STORM - DAY
The COLDWATER descends to hover a moment until a huge wave reaches up and seizes upon its crest.

INT - BRIDGE - DAY

TURCK:

All screens, full reverse.

The engines whine in full reverse.

EXT - STORM - DAY
Down into the trough the COLDWATER slips, wallowing like the carcass of a dead whale

INT - BRIDGE - DAY

ALVAREZ

Surface running. Set trim. Hard aport. All stations report.

The stations report in as the ship rocks and rolls then steadies to a gentle rise and fall as the ship begins to cut the waves.

TURCK:

Mr. Alvarez, I shall be in my quarters resting. Call me at six bells or as required. As an ancestor once said, "Feel free to call any time. The Porthole will be open."

INT - TURCK'S CABIN - DAY
Johnson knocks on door rousing Turck.

TURCK:

Enter.

JOHNSON:

Mr. Alvarez sent me, Captain. It is Six Bells, Sir.

TURCK:

Very well, Mr. Johnson. Tell Mr. Alvarez I will be there on the bounce.

Johnson salutes and exits. Turck rises and settles cap on head before opening door.

INT - CORRIDOR - DAY
Turck exits cabin and turns to the bridge. Johnson looks out from another cabin and heads the other way.

INT - ENGINE ROOM - DAY
A hand opens a tank lid and pours a small amount of liquid in the tank.

INT - BRIDGE - DAY
Turck arrives on bridge amid shrieking wind.

HELMSMAN:

Captain's on the bridge.

ALVAREZ

All quiet, sir.

The wind howls loudly.

TURCK:

I can tell.

ALVAREZ

We are making headway, though slowly, and it's beginning to look as though we will pull through.

TURCK:

Very well, Mr. Alvarez, go below and get some rest. The second officer will relieve you.

ALVAREZ

He's not here, sir.

TURCK:

Where is he?

ALVAREZ

He said he was going to check on the work on the generators, sir.

TURCK:

When he returns, Mr. Alvarez, go below and get some sleep.

ALVAREZ

Aye, aye, sir. I'll be glad when the sun comes out.

Turck stares out at the storm. Johnson returns to the bridge.

TURCK:

Mr. Johnson, relieve Mr. Alvarez so he can get some rest.

JOHNSON:

What, oh, yes, sir. Relieve, sir. Mr. Alvarez, I relieve you.

ALVAREZ

All quiet, Mr. Johnson. Course 270, 10 knots surface running. All engines optimal.

JOHNSON:

A moment while I check, Mr. Alvarez.

Alvarez and Turck exchange startled glances. Johnson leans over the control console.

JOHNSON:

Mr. Alvarez. Please explain the overheating readings on engines one, two and five.

ALVAREZ

(rushing to console) They were fine not two minutes ago.

Turck looks at helmsman who nods in agreement. Turck presses the intercom button.

TURCK:

Engineering, check engines one, two and five. Instruments indicate overheating.

The COLDWATER suddenly swerves to one side and begins to roll sickeningly.

INT - ENGINE ROOM - DAY
Delcarte throws a rag down as the engines quit. He punches the intercom.

DELCARTE:

Captain, engine room, Delcarte here. Numbers one, two, and five engines have broken down, sir, for unknown reasons. They just quit working. Shall we force the remaining three?

INT - BRIDGE - DAY

TURCK:

We can do nothing else. Just keep us into the wind.

DELCARTE (v.o.)

The engines won't stand the gaff, sir.

TURCK:

Can you suggest a better plan?

DELCARTE(v.o.)

No, sir

TURCK:

Then give them the gaff, lieutenant.

INT - ENGINE ROOM - DAY
Delcarte turns from the communicator.

DELCARTE:

All hands stand to. We are going to push these god-forsaken engines to their limits and beyond. Edgar, take engine three, Rice, engine four, Burroughs, take engine six. Nurse them like they were your own babies. With luck we'll get through.

The engines rev up and whine with strain as the engineers nurse them.

INT - BRIDGE - DAY
The crew watch the bow plowing into wave after wave and miraculously emerge.

TURCK:

What is our position, Helmsman?

HELMSMAN:

Same as before, Captain.

TURCK:

I doubt if we will make a foot of headway but it is enough to keep her nose in the wind, and, at least, we were not drifting toward thirty.

Without warning, the bow swings swiftly around and the ship falls into the trough of the sea. Alarms go off. Delcarte hails the bridge

DELCARTE(v.o.)

The other engines have failed, Captain.

TURCK:

Continue on, Mr. Delcarte.

JOHNSON:

You always have been curious, sir, about the great unknown beyond thirty, You are in a good way to have your curiosity satisfied.

ALVAREZ:

When Lieutenant Turck crosses thirty, we shall all cross with him, and God help the officer or the man who reproaches him!

JOHNSON:

I shall not be a party to high treason. The regulations are explicit, and if the COLDWATER crosses thirty it devolves upon you to place Lieutenant Turck under arrest and immediately exert every endeavor to bring the ship back into Pan-American waters.

ALVAREZ:

I shall not know that the COLDWATER passes thirty; nor shall any other man aboard know it.

Alvarez draws a revolver from his pocket, and puts a bullet into every navigational instrument upon the bridge. Alvarez salutes and strides from the bridge.

JOHNSON:

Shall I place him under arrest?

TURCK:

You shall not. Nor shall anyone else.

JOHNSON:

You become a party to his crime!

TURCK:

You may go below, Mr. Johnson and attend to the work of unpacking the extra instruments and having them properly set upon the bridge.

JOHNSON salutes, and leaves the bridge. Turck bows his head for a moment then straightens and turns to the Helmsman.

TURCK:

Mr Taylor, rig the sea anchor.

TAYLOR

Aye, aye, sir. Rig the sea anchor.

EXT - DECK - DAY
Men race out onto the bow and throw the anchor overboard. The COLDWATER swings around rapidly, her nose pointing once more into the wind, and the frightful rolling consequent upon her wallowing in the trough happily diminishes.

INT - HOLD - DAY
An axe comes down on boxes of navigational equipment, smashing the delicate instruments inside. Alvarez raises the axe again when Johnson breaks into the hold and grabs the axe.

JOHNSON:

My God, you fool. What are you doing. You'll kill us all.

Alvarez punches Johnson in the nose and finishes breaking the last box. Alvarez salutes and leaves the hold.

INT - BRIDGE - DAY
Alvarez appears. He is pale, and seems to have aged ten years. He comes to attention and salutes.

ALVAREZ:

Sir, I wish to report an assault on one of the ship's officers. I struck Lieutenant Johnson when he interrupted me as I destroyed the replacement instruments. Sir, I respectfully request you place me under arrest.

TURCK:

Lieutenant Alvarez, John, I cannot condone your action but I do not believe I shall place you under arrest as I myself plan to defy the regulation that raised the dead lines, and to take my ship back to New York myself. I do not ask you to share the responsibility with me. I merely state that I shall refuse to submit to arrest, and that I shall demand of you and every other officer and man implicit obedience to my every command until we dock at home

ALVAREZ:

I assure you that the captain will find me as ready to acknowledge your command upon the wrong side of thirty as upon the right.

TURCK:

Thank you for your assurance, which I do not need. Continue on our present course. I shall be in my quarters. Writing my report on the day's incidents.

ALVAREZ

Shall I bring up my set of hand instruments, then, sir? I brought my own set from my last berth, when they de-commissioned the Dejah Thoris. I would never leave a ship without the means to locate herself, sir.

TURCK:

I should have known. Carry on, Mr. Alvarez. Notify me when the sun breaks through.

Alvarez exits.

INT - HALLWAY - DAY
Johnson hurries down the hall but hides as Alvarez walks past. One of his eyes is swollen and already darkening, and his lip is cut and bleeding. He stares after Alvarez and hurries on.

INT - BRIDGE - DAY
Johnson surges onto the bridge. Without even the formality of a salute, he bursts in, white with fury.

JOHNSON:

Lieutenant Alvarez attacked me! I demand that he be placed under arrest. I found him in the act of destroying the reserve instruments, and when I would have interfered to protect them he fell upon me and beat me. I demand that you arrest him!

TURCK:

You forget yourself, Mr. Johnson. You are not in command of the ship. I deplore the action of Lieutenant Alvarez, but I cannot expunge from my mind the loyalty and self-sacrificing friendship which has prompted him to his acts. Were I you, Mister, I should profit by the example he has set. Further, Mr. Johnson, I intend retaining command of the ship, even though she crosses thirty, and I shall demand implicit obedience from every officer and man aboard until I am properly relieved from duty by a superior officer in the port of New York.

JOHNSON:

You mean to say that you will cross thirty without submitting to arrest?

TURCK:

I do, Mister. And now you may go below, and, when again you find it necessary to address me, you will please be so good as to bear in mind the fact that I am your commanding officer, and as such entitled to a salute.

Johnson flushes, hesitates a moment, and then, saluting, turns upon his heel and leaves the bridge.

EXT - BRIDGE DECK - DAY
The sea is calm and the sun peers out of a cloudy sky. Experienced brown hands adjust the sextant until Alvarez is satisfied. He flips open a book and reads a few lines, compares what he finds with a slip of paper on a clipboard in Turck's hand, then snaps the book shut.

ALVAREZ

Confirmed, Captain. This is our present location.

Turck nods and turns to the communication console. Johnson stands in front of it for a moment, then stands aside. Turck punches a button.

TURCK:

Men, you are anxiously awaiting information as to the ship's position. It has been determined to be latitude fifty degrees seven minutes north, longitude twenty degrees sixteen minutes west. Beyond thirty. But there will be no change in commanding officers, in routine or in discipline, until after we have docked again in New York.

EXT - DECK - DAY
As Turck steps back from the rail, a roar of applause rises from the deck.

EXT - BRIDGE DECK - DAY
Alvarez looks pleased. Delcarte springs up the outside ladder.

DELCARTE:

Captain, I can find no reason for the generators to have failed as they have. But I am positive the surface engines were sabotaged.

JOHNSON:

I fear that it might be impossible to repair the generators.

TURCK:

Lieutenant Johnson, you will take charge of the work on the generators. I shall expect good news soon.

Johnson salutes and smirks as he turns away.

ALVAREZ:

Should you trust him to work on the generators?

TURCK:

If he is to return to Pan-America, he must repair the generators. Delcarte admits it is beyond his skills. And, since Johnson always has been accounted one of the best gravitation-screen men in the navy, I have little choice. He has invented several of the improvements that are incorporated in the later models of these generators, and I am convinced that he knows more concerning both the theory and the practice of screening gravitation than any living Pan-American. However, it would not be amiss if you keep an eye on him.

ALVAREZ:

Aye, aye, sir!

TURCK:

Also, I shall appoint a board to investigate and report upon the disaster and to investigate the sabotage of the engines.

INT - CAPTAIN'S CABIN - DAY
Turck is writing in the log when a knock comes at the door.

TURCK:

Enter.

Several officers enter including Johnson, Alvarez, and Delcarte.

OFFICER:

We are here to present the board's findings.

TURCK:

And?

OFFICER

We find the screen-generators failed due to extreme age and were not sabotaged. We further recommend a commendation to Lieu-tenant Porfirio Johnson for his extraordinary efforts in keeping the generators running for as long as they did. As for the surface engines, we find that engines one, two and five failed due to inadequate maintenance in that the fuel lines were clogged with an unknown substance. We recommend a letter of reprimand be inserted in Lieutenant Delcarte's record. Our full report is contained in this folder.

TURCK:

Thank you. Your recommendations have been noted. Dismissed.

The board begins to file out.

TURCK:

Lieutenants Alvarez and Delcarte, please remain behind. Close the door, Lieutenant. Rest at ease, Delcarte. I do not believe the report. It appears several of my officers are in sympathy with Lieutenant Johnson.

ALVAREZ

It did seem strange that they would go out of their way to clear him by name.

TURCK:

What can you tell me about the engines, Delcarte?

DELCARTE:

Sir, I have found out the reason for the engines going out. It's sugar, Captain.

ALVAREZ

Sugar?

DELCARTE:

Sugar. When mixed with the fuel it forms a sludge that clogs the fuel lines. If any one wanted to sabotage the engines and still be able to restart them, well, I'd have used sugar, too. However the other three engines are shot, the bearings are burned through and the cores are melted into lumps. We can make headway on the three engines but it will take us at least a week to make it back to Thirty.

TURCK:

Carry on, Mr. Delcarte. Oh, Mr. Delcarte, we will be running short of food shortly. I plan to put all our lifeboats out for fishing duty. would you care to join me and a couple other sailors for a fishing trip?

DELCARTE:

Aye, aye, sir.

TURCK:

Mr. Alvarez, order the boats out for fishing duty. Order the boats to put off to the west. We will pick them up as we come to them in the evening. I will not violate the regulations any further by voluntarily heading east. I will command one of them with Mr. Delcarte, Helmsman Taylor and a wireless operator. See to it. I will be ready tomorrow morning.

EXT - SEA - MORNING
The COLDWATER rides on the surface, serenely moving west. The sun shines high in the sky behind her. A hook plops into the water and the camera follows the line up to reveal Turck holding the pole. in a small powered lifeboat. He turns to Delcarte.

TURCK:

I haven't had this much fun in years. One more fish and I'll have my quota for the day and I can get back to my history books.

DELCARTE:

History? I thought they were Geography books. Didn't I see maps in them?

TURCK:

You did see maps, but they are maps of Europe.

SNIDER:

Weren't all books on anything beyond thirty supposed to have been burnt generations ago?

TURCK:

Supposedly, but these are my great, great, great, etcetera, etcetera grandfather's sailing maps. Therefore they do not fall under the ban.

Turck's line bobs and he begins to bring in a fish but he is interrupted by a shout from Snider.

SNIDER:

Look! They've repaired the engines and the generators both. We're saved.

The men look up and see the COLDWATER flying over the water, dropping to pick up the only other boat in sight. At the sight of the COLDWATER once more under control, the three men burst into a glad cheer. But the ship rises farther above the water and makes straight west. But, though the boat was plainly visible from the bridge of the aero-submarine and to the hundreds of men who swarm her deck, the ship passes directly above them, not five hundred feet from the water, and speeds directly westward.

TAYLOR

What's going on? They're leaving us.

SNIDER:

The bastards.

The crew all shout and Turck fires the flare pistol to attract the ship's attention, but the ship moves steadily away, growing smaller and smaller until at last she passes completely out of sight.

INT - BRIDGE - DAY
A gun pokes into Alvarez's side as the launch disappears behind the ship.

JOHNSON:

Mr. Alvarez, I place you under arrest for striking a fellow officer, the destruction of Pan-American Naval equipment, and of conspiring to defy regulations barring the crossing of thirty. Put him in chains.

Johnson moves to the back of the bridge and watches the launch disappear behind the ship.

JOHNSON:

Good bye, Captain Turck. Bon Voyage.

EXT - SEA - DAY
Snider turns the boat in futile pursuit of the COLDWATER.

TURCK:

Bring her about, Snider, and hold her due east. We can't catch the COLDWATER, and we can't cross the Atlantic in this. Our only hope lies in making the nearest land, which, unless I am mistaken, is the Scilly Islands, off the southwest coast of England. Ever heard of England, Snider?

SNIDER:

There's a part of the United States of North America that used to be known to the ancients as New England. Is that where you mean, sir?

TURCK:

No, Snider. The England I refer to was an island off the continent of Europe. It was the seat of a very powerful kingdom that flourished over two hundred years ago. A part of the United States of North America and all of the Federated States of Canada once belonged to this ancient England.

TAYLOR:

Europe. My grandfather used to tell me stories of the world beyond thirty. He had been a great student, and he had read much from forbidden books.

TURCK:

In which I resemble your grandfather, for I, too, have read more even than naval officers are supposed to read, and, as you men know, we are permitted a greater latitude in the study of geography and history than men of other professions.Among the books and papers of Admiral Porter Turck, who lived two hundred years ago, and from whom I am descended, many volumes still exist, and are in my possession, which deal with the history and geography of ancient Europe. Usually I bring several of these books with me upon a cruise, and this time, among others, I have maps of Europe and her surrounding waters. I was studying them as we came away from the COLDWATER this morning, and luckily I brought them with me.

TAYLOR:

You are going to try to make Europe, sir?

TURCK:

It is the nearest land. I have always wanted to explore the forgotten lands of the Eastern Hemisphere. Here's our chance. To remain at sea is to perish. I'm sorry, but none of us ever will see home again. Let us make the best of it, and enjoy while we do live that which is forbidden the balance of our race--the adventure and the mystery which lie beyond thirty.

Taylor and Delcarte seize the spirit of Turck's mood but Snider is a trifle skeptical.

SNIDER:

It's treason to head east. We should go west.

TURCK:

It is treason, sir, but there is no law which compels us to visit punishment upon ourselves. Could we return to Pan-America, I should be the first to insist that we face it. But we know that's not possible. Even if this craft would carry us so far, we haven't enough water or food for more than three days. We are doomed, Snider, to die far from home and without ever again looking upon the face of another fellow countryman than those who sit here now in this boat. Isn't that punishment sufficient for even the most exacting judge?

SNIDER:

I suppose so, sir.

TURCK:.

Very well, then, let us live while we live, and enjoy to the fullest whatever of adventure or pleasure each new day brings, since any day may be our last, and we shall be dead for a considerable while.

EXT - CHANNEL - MORNING
Shortly after dawn land is in sight.

TAYLOR

Land, ho!

SNIDER:

Is it England?

TURCK:

Yes, we were just off Ram Head near Plymouth Bay and Plymouth is inland a short distance. However, It will make little difference which city we enter, as the English people are famed of old for their hospitality toward visiting mariners.

As they approach the mouth of the bay they scan the coast and waters.

TURCK:

We should see fishing boats coming out to start their day. Do any of you see any channel buoys?

No buoy nor light nor any other mark to show larger ships the channel appear. The coast is densely overgrown, nor is any building or sign of man apparent from the water. Up the bay and into the River Tamar they motor through a solitude as unbroken as that which rested upon the waters of the Channel. No indication that man had ever set his foot upon this silent coast can be seen.

DELCARTE:

I see no sign of war.

TAYLOR

As far as this portion of the Devon coast is concerned, the war seems to have been over for many years, but neither are there any people.

TURCK:

I cannot not find it within myself to believe that we shall find no inhabitants in England. Reasoning thus, it is improbable that a state of war still exists, and that the people all had been drawn from this portion of England to some other, where they might better defend themselves against an invader.

TAYLOR

But what of their ancient coast defenses? What is there here in Plymouth Bay to prevent an enemy landing in force and marching where they wished? Nothing. I cannot believe that any enlightened military nation, such as the ancient English are reputed to have been, would have voluntarily so deserted an exposed coast and an excellent harbor to the mercies of an enemy.

DELCARTE:

Look, ruins.

TURCK:

Land, now. beach this boat.

EXT - PLYMOUTH - DAY
Turck's boots scuff through the rubble.

TURCK:

According to my map, a large city should rear its spires and chimneys right here.

TAYLOR

There is nothing but rough, broken ground covered densely with weeds and brambles, and tall, rank, grass. If a city ever stood there, no sign of it remains. The roughness and unevenness of the ground suggests something of a great mass of debris hidden by the accumulation of centuries of undergrowth.

Turck draws the short cutlass at his side and with its point digs into the loam about the roots of the vegetation. The blade enters the soil for a matter of two inches, striking something stone-like. Digging about the obstacle, Turck presently loosens it, and draws out an ancient brick of clay, baked in an oven. Snider and Taylor each engage in the fascinating sport of prospecting for antiques.

SNIDER:

Look what I found. A human skull.

Turck examines it. Directly in the center of the forehead is a small round hole.

TAYLOR

Look, this was under it. A metal spike and some tarnished and corroded metal ornaments.

With his cutlass Snider scrapes the dirt and verdigris from the face of the larger ornament.

SNIDER:

An inscription.

TURCK:

They are the spike and ornaments of an ancient German helmet. There are more over here. and here. But I am at loss to account for the presence of German soldiers upon the English coast so far from London, which history suggests would have been the natural goal of an invader. I can only account for it by assuming that either England was temporarily conquered by the Teutons, or that an invasion of so vast proportions was undertaken that German troops were hurled upon the England coast in huge numbers and that landings were necessarily effected at many places simultaneously. Farther east, nearer London, we shall find things very different.

TAYLOR

There will be the civilization that two centuries must have wrought upon our English cousins as they had upon us. There will be mighty cities, cultivated fields, happy people. We will be welcomed as long-lost brothers. We will find a great nation anxious to learn of the world beyond their side of thirty, as we have been anxious to learn of that which lay beyond our side of the dead line.

Turck turns back toward the boat.

TURCK:

Come, men! We will go up the river and fill our casks with fresh water, search for food and fuel, and then tomorrow be in readiness to push on toward the east. I am going to London.

The report of a gun blasts the silence with startling abruptness.

SNIDER:

The launch

In an instant they are running for the boat.

EXT - BEACH - DAY
Delcarte, a hundred yards inland from the launch, leans over something which lies on the ground. Delcarte waves his cap, and stooping, lifts a small deer. A horrid, half- human, half-bestial scream a little ahead and to the right of the men brings them to a halt..Delcarte quickly throws his rifle to his shoulder. At the same moment a tiger appears from the woods.

SNIDER:

What is it, sir?

The Tiger stalks straight for Delcarte, who levels his rifle upon it.

TURCK:

The beast is called Felis tigris of ancient Asia, A tiger! Taylor, follow me. Delcarte, do not fire until we reach you, our small caliber, steel-jacketed bullets might only enrage it still further.

Delcarte fires. With the report the tiger stops short in apparent surprise, then bites savagely at its shoulder. It wheels toward Delcarte, issuing the most terrific roars and screams, and launches itself, with incredible speed, toward the brave fellow, pumping bullets from his automatic rifle as rapidly as the weapon would fire.

Taylor and Turck also open fire on the creature, broadside it offers a splendid target.

Straight as a torpedo it rushes for Delcarte, and rears upon him and crushes him to the earth, dying as it hits him.

TAYLOR

Delcarte. Are you all right.

DELCARTE:

I'm fine. what a trophy.

TURCK:

But what is a tiger doing here, at so great a distance from its native habitat? My readings have taught me it is practically unknown outside of Asia, and that, so late as the twentieth century, at least, there were no savage beasts outside captivity in England.

Snider joins the group and Turck returns his rifle to him. Taylor and Snider pick up the slain deer, and they start down toward the launch, walking slowly.

DELCARTE:

Captain, I'd like to take the skin for a trophy.

TURCK:

Permission denied. We have no means to properly cure it.

DELCARTE:

Damn shame to waste it.

TURCK:

We'll skin the deer on the beach and take as much meat as we can dispose of.

A series of screams from the bushes a short distance away startle them. A tiger peers out of the brush.

TAYLOR:

Another Felis tigris.

DELCARTE:

Or a dozen of them.

One after another, eight tigers leap into view.

TURCK:

Run for the launch. Three rifles are no match for them. And hope to hell they can't swim.

The crew scramble into the launch and shove off. The tigers halt at the beach, pacing back and forth, uttering fiendish cries, and glaring in the most malevolent manner.As they motor away, they hear the calls of similar animals far inland.

TAYLOR

They seem to be answering the cries of their fellows at the water's edge, and from the wide distribution and great volume of the sound, enormous numbers of these beasts must roam the adjacent country.

SNIDER:

They have eaten up the inhabitants.

TURCK:

I imagine you are right, for their extreme boldness and fearlessness in the presence of man would suggest either that man is entirely unknown to them.

SNIDER:

Or that they are extremely familiar with him as their natural and most easily procured prey.

DELCARTE:

But where did they come from? Could they have traveled here from Asia?

TURCK:

The thing is a puzzle to me. I know it is practically beyond reason to imagine that tigers had crossed the mountain ranges and rivers and all the great continent of Europe to travel this far from their native lairs, and entirely impossible that they should have crossed the English Channel at all. Yet here they are, and in great numbers.

The engine coughs.

TAYLOR

We're low on chemical fuel. We'll need to stop and distill more before we can go on under power.

Looking over at the tigers which have been following them Turck demurs.

TURCK:

We'll need to step our folding mast and proceed under sail, hoarding our fuel supply for use in emergencies.

EXT - STRAIT - DAY
The launch passes the land slowly.

SNIDER:

There's no sign of man any where.

TURCK:

There should be a lighthouse on that headland. We'll beach the launch there and look for more meat and supplies. Exchange the steel-jacketed bullets for softnose ones in your magazines and belts.

EXT - BEACH - DAY
The launch runs up on the beach and Snider leaps out and ties up the launch. Taylor breaks out some bars of food from a small locker.

TURCK:

After eating, we will set out in search of fuel, leaving Taylor to guard the launch.

SNIDER:

Why Taylor? It's my turn to watch the launch.

TURCK:

Taylor needs to set up the distillation converter for the chemical fuel. Can you do that?

SNIDER:

No.

TURCK:

No, SIR.

SNIDER:

No, sir.

Snider takes his bar of food and sits apart from the rest.

TAYLOR

You don't trust Snider.

DELCARTE:

He disapproves of your plan to visit England. I do not know but what, at his first opportunity, he might desert us, taking the launch with him, and attempt to return to Pan-America.

TAYLOR

He would be a fool to venture it.

TURCK:

But he would try. Wonderful dinner, Taylor. Snider, let's go.

EXT - FOREST - DAY

Passing through a park-like wood, the crew comes suddenly upon a score of hairy, half-naked men, resting in the shade of a great tree. At the first sight of the crew the savages spring to their feet with wild yells, seizing long spears that had lain beside them as they rested. For a matter of fifty yards they run as rapidly as they can, and then they turn and survey the crew for a moment. Emboldened by the smallness of the crew, they commence to advance, brandishing their spears and shouting horribly. Snider points his rifle at the leader. Turck knocks it down as the gun discharges. The savages stop at the sound.

TURCK:

Stow that, Snider. We're not here to kill them. And they just might be able to help us. Wait, we are friends.

Turck raises his left hand. One SAVAGE advances to them raising his left hand.

SAVAGE

Who are you and from what country?

TURCK:

I am Captain Jefferson Turk. We are from Pan-America. Across the Atlantic Ocean.

SAVAGE:

Where is that? I have never heard of it, or of the Atlantic Ocean.

TURCK:

It has been two hundred years since a Pan-American visited England.

SAVAGE:

England? What is England?

TURCK:

Why this is a part of England!

SAVAGE:

This is Grubitten. I know nothing about England, and I have lived here all my life.

SNIDER:

What is this "Grubbitten"?

TURCK:

Unquestionably it is a corruption of Great Britain, a name formerly given to the large island comprising England, Scotland and Wales. Can you direct us to Ryde or Newport?

SAVAGE:

I have never heard of such countries.

TURCK:

Are there any cities in this country?

SAVAGE:

What means this word cities?

TURCK:

What I mean by city is a place where many people live together in houses.

SAVAGE:

Oh, you mean a camp! Yes, there are two great camps here, East Camp and West Camp. We are from East Camp.

TURCK:

Is the great war over, and who was victorious?

SAVAGE:

No, The war is not yet over. But it soon will be, and it will end, as it always does, with the Westenders running away. We, the Eastend-ers, are always victorious.

TURCK:

No, I don't mean your petty tribal quarrels. I mean the Great War, the war with Germany. Is it ended--and who was victorious?

SAVAGE:

I never heard of any of these strange countries of which you speak.

DELCARTE:

Incredible, these people living at the very seat of the Great War know nothing of it. and to us upon the far side of the Atlantic it still is a subject of keen interest.

TURCK:

What people live upon the mainland?

SAVAGE:

No one lives there, Long ago, it is said, my people dwelt across the waters upon that other land; but the wild beasts devoured them in such numbers that finally they were driven here, paddling across upon logs and driftwood, nor has any dared return since, because of the frightful creatures which dwell in that horrid country.

TURCK:

Do no other peoples ever come to your country in ships?

SAVAGE:

I have never heard the word ship before, and do not know its meaning. But I assure you that until you came I had thought that there were no other peoples in the world other than the Grubittens, who consist of the Eastenders and the Westenders of the ancient Isle of Wight.

TURCK:

We need your help. We are looking for tubers. Potatoes, I think they were called.

SAVAGE

How many do you need?

DELCARTE:

About two hundred.

SAVAGE

How many is that?

TURCK:

Each man carrying ten tubers.

SAVAGE

Ah, come. We will get cupple hunert.

EXT - VILLAGE - DAY
The crew and the savages enter the walled village filled with mud huts with thatched roofs. Hundreds of people crowd around the Crew. Snider looks frightened and disgusted. SAVAGE leads the crew to a large hut and swings open the curtain door.

INT - STOREROOM - DAY
Turck looks in at baskets of food, mostly potatoes.

SAVAGE

We had a big crop this year. Most of the potatoes will rot. Take your cupple hunert with our blessing.

TURCK:

How can we repay you?

SAVAGE

No need to repay. We have much. You need. We give. We will help you carry the potatoes to your camp. Come, carry twenny baskets.

The villagers gather baskets and follow the crew out.

EXT - VILLAGE - DAY
An impromptu parade exits the village.

EXT - BEACH - EVENING
Taylor jumps to his feet as the parade arrives. He grabs his rifle.

TURCK:

It's us, Taylor. with friends and tubers.

TAYLOR:

Great. the converter is ready.

TURCK:

Just pour the potatoes into the funnel.

The villagers pour the potatoes into the converter. The clear tank fills with clear liquid.

SAVAGE

What are you doing with the food?

TURCK:

We're making food for our launch.

TAYLOR

Actually we're finished, Captain.

TURCK:

Pack up. We're leaving. Thank you for your generosity.

As the launch sails away, the Grubittens line the shore in silent wonder at the strange sight of the dainty craft dancing over the sparkling waters, and watch until the launch clears the headland sailing into the gathering darkness.

EXT - THAMES - DAY
The launch motors up the river, passing the overgrown banks on either side of it.

SNIDER:

Where are the tugs and the lighters and the barges, the lightships and the buoys, and all those countless attributes you said went to make up the myriad life of the ancient Thames?

TURCK:

Gone! All gone! Only silence and desolation reign where once the commerce of the world had centered. I can find but a single word of explanation-- war!

Turck bows his head and turns his eyes downward from the lonely and depressing sight, and in silence they proceed up the deserted river. Snider breaks out whistling "Yankee Doodle".

SNIDER:

July 6, 2137. Happy Birthday USA.

TAYLOR

That's the Fourth of July, dummy.

SNIDER:

Fourth or Sixth, whatever. I just wish we were home right now.

DELCARTE:

We all wish we were home.

SNIDER:

He doesn't. He's glad we're stuck here. He wants to be here. It's his fault we're here.

TURCK:

Snider, shut up. If I could I would take you home, but I can't we are stuck here as you said so we better make the best of it until we can make contact with the English authorities and arrange passage home. Until then we need food. We have run out of the deer meat and I plan to go hunting. Put into shore.

EXT - SHORE - DAY
The launch noses into the sand and Turck disembarks with a rifle in hand.

TURCK:

Set up camp. I will call when I have bagged a deer.

SNIDER:

What about the tigers?

TURCK:

We haven't seen a sign of them in over a week. I don't think there are any around here.

Turck leaves as the crew breaks out the tent.

EXT - FOREST - DAY
Turck crawls up in the brush and pushes it aside to line up his sights on a grazing deer but stops in amazement as he sees an elephant. The deer, although in plain view of the huge beast, pays not the slightest attention to it The elephant browses on the young and tender shoots of some low bushes, waving his great ears and switching his short tail. The deer, scarce twenty paces from him, continue their feeding, when suddenly, from close beside the deer, there comes a most terrifying roar, and a great, tawny body shoots from the concealing brush beyond the deer, full upon the back of a small buck. The startled and terrified buck utters cries of agony. His fellows leap off in all directions. The elephant raises his trunk, and, trumpeting loudly, lumbers off. crushing down small trees and trampling bushes in his mad flight.

Growling horribly, the huge lion stands across the body of his prey.

Truck rises to see the lion better, not fifty paces from him, in full view.

The lion sees Turck and with a most ferocious roar charges. Turck shoots..With a terrific howl of pain and rage, the brute rolls over and over upon the ground almost to my feet. Turck pumps two more bullets into him. The lion dies. Turck leans against a nearby tree, wiping the perspiration from his face. Without warning, a heavy spear imbeds itself in the wood not three inches from Turck's head. Turck leaps behind the tree and peers around the other side. The head of a man emerges from behind a bush. The fellow is hairy and unkempt, and garbed in primitive fashion. He stands for a moment gazing about, and then advances. A number of others, precisely like him, step from the nearby bushes and follow in his wake. Turck retreats. The savages approach the tree dragging their captive--a woman whose hands are bound behind her and who is being pulled along by two of the men. At the body of the lion, they pause, much excited over the kill. The leader retrieves his spear and motions for the men to search for Turck. They spread out beating the bush. The leader and the two with the woman march on straight at Turck. The woman stumbles. One of the men at her side jerks her roughly to her feet and the other strikes her across the mouth. Instantly Turck leaps from concealment, and, fells the savage with a blow. The other savage draws a knife and lunges viciously at Turck, at the same time giving voice to a wild cry of alarm. Turck parries with his forearm, delivering a powerful blow to the jaw that sends the savage reeling back; but the first savage attacks again . Turck draws his revolver. He shoots both savages. The Leader stands with his spear ready.

TURCK:

Go away or I will kill you.

LEADER

No little stick can kill us.

TURCK:

Don't try me.

LEADER

Give me the girl and I will let you live.

TURCK:

Fat chance. Now, beat it.

Leader swings his arm back to throw the spear. Turck shoots him. The balance of the party is coming rapidly. Turck seizes the woman's arm and pushes her behind a nearby tree, as several spears hit the tree where they were standing. With the girl safe behind the tree, Turck steps out.

TURCK:

I am not your enemy. Stop and listen to me.

SAVAGE 2

He is afraid. Kill him.

The savages launch a couple of spears which miss.

TURCK:

You asked for this.

Turck methodically picks off the advancing savages until the few that are left break and run.

Turck turns to the woman. The woman is of medium height, well formed, and with fine, clear- cut features. Her forehead is high, and her eyes both intelligent and beautiful. A trace of apprehension marks her expression and astonishment is apparent in her eyes. She stands quite erect and meets his gaze with level, proud mein.

TURCK:

What language do you speak? Do you understand mine?

VICTORY:

Yes, It is similar to my own. I am Grabritin. What are you?

TURCK:

I am a Pan-American,

VICTORY:

Where is that?

TURCK:

(pointing to the west.) Far away, across the ocean.

VICTORY:

(frowning) Take off your cap.

Turck removes cap. VICTORY appears relieved. She edges to one side and leans over to peer behind Turck. He turns quickly to see what she discovers, but finding nothing, wheels about to see that her expression has once more altered.

VICTORY:

(pointing east) You are not from there? You are not from across the water there?

TURCK:

No, I am from Pan-America, far away to the west. Have you ever heard of Pan-America?

VICTORY:

I do not care where you are from, if you are not from there, and I am sure you are not, for the men from there have horns and tails.

TURCK:

Who are the men from there?

VICTORY:

They are bad men. Some of my people do not believe that there are such creatures. But we have a legend--a very old, old legend, that once the men from there came across to Grabritin. They came upon the water, and under the water, and even in the air. They came in great numbers, so that they rolled across the land like a great gray fog. They brought with them thunder and lightning and smoke that killed, and they fell upon us and slew our people by the thousands and the hundreds of thousands. But at last we drove them back to the water's edge, back into the sea, where many were drowned. Some escaped, and these our people followed--men, women, and even children, we followed them back. That is all. The legend says our people never returned. Maybe they were all killed. Maybe they are still there. But this, also, is in the legend, that as we drove the men back across the water they swore that they would return, and that when they left our shores they would leave no human being alive behind them. I was afraid that you were from there.

TURCK:

By what name were these men called?

VICTORY:

We call them only the 'men from there'. I have never heard that they had another name. Am I now your prisoner?

TURCK:

No, of course not.

Victory turns her back to him.

VICTORY:

Then will you untie me?

TURCK:

Forgive me. I was, well, distracted...

Turck cuts her bonds and she turns back.

VICTORY:

Thank you.

TURCK:

And now, let me accompany you to your home and see you safely again under the protection of your friends.

VICTORY:

No, you must not come with me--Buckingham will kill you.

TURCK:

And who is Buckingham and why should he wish to kill me?

VICTORY:

He would think that you had stolen me and as he wishes me for himself, he will kill any other whom he thinks desires me. He killed Wettin a few days ago. My mother told me once that Wettin was my father. He was king. Now Buckingham is king.

TURCK:

Are we far from the city of London?

VICTORY:

I do not know what you mean.

TURCK:

London is a city with mighty buildings of stone and brick, broad avenues, parks, palaces, and countless people...

VICTORY:

There is no such place near by. Only the Camp of the Lions has places of stone where the beasts lair, but there are no people in the Camp of the Lions. Who would dare go there!

TURCK:

The Camp of the Lions And where is that, and what?

VICTORY:

(pointing west, upriver) It is there .I have seen it from a great distance, but I have never been there. We are much afraid of the lions, for this is their country, and they are angry that man has come to live here. Far away there to the south-west is the land of tigers, which is even worse than this, the land of the lions, for the tigers are more numerous than the lions and hungrier for human flesh. There were tigers here long ago, but both the lions and the men set upon them and drove them off.

TURCK:

Where did these savage beasts come from?

VICTORY:

Oh, they have been here always. It is their country.

TURCK:

Do they not kill and eat your people?

VICTORY:

Often, when we meet them by accident, and we are too few to slay them, or when one goes too close to their camp. But seldom do they hunt us, for they find what food they need among the deer and wild cattle, and, too, we make them gifts, for are we not intruders in their country? Really we live upon good terms with them, though I should not care to meet one were there not many spears in my party.

TURCK:

I should like to visit this Camp of the Lions.

VICTORY:

Oh, no, you must not! That would be terrible. They would eat you. You must go now, for any minute Buckingham may come in search of me. Long since should they have learned that I am gone from the camp--they watch over me very closely--and they will set out after me. Go! I shall wait here until they come in search of me.

TURCK:

No, I'll not leave you alone in a land infested by lions and other wild beasts. If you won't let me go as far as your camp with you, then I'll wait here until they come in search of you.

VICTORY:

Please go! You have saved me, and I would save you, but nothing will save you if Buckingham gets his hands on you. He is a bad man. He wishes to have me for his woman so that he may be king. He would kill anyone who befriended me, for fear that I might become another's.

TURCK:

Didn't you say that Buckingham is already the king?

VICTORY:

He is. He took my mother for his woman after he had killed Wettin. But my mother will die soon--she is very old--and then the man to whom I belong will become king. The line of descent is through the women. A man is merely head of his wife's family--that is all. If she chances to be the oldest female member of the "royal" house, he is king. There is seldom any doubt as to whom a child's mother is. This accounts for my importance in the community and for Buckingham's anxiety to claim me. I do not wish to become his woman, for he is a bad man and will make a bad king. But he is powerful, and there is no other man who dares dispute his wishes.

TURCK:

Why not come with me, if you do not wish to become Buckingham's?

VICTORY:

Where would you take me? No, I cannot leave my people. I must stay and do my best, even if Buckingham gets me, but you must go at once. Do not wait until it is too late. The lions have had no offering for a long time, and Buckingham would seize upon the first stranger as a gift to them.

Buckingham drops down on Turck and a half dozen others join in and soon have Turck bound. Buckingham has hold of Victory when Turck is raised to his feet.

VICTORY:

It is too bad that you did not do as I bid you for now it has happened just as I feared--Buckingham has you.

TURCK:

Which is Buckingham?

BUCKINGHAM

I am Buckingham. And who are you who would have stolen my woman?

VICTORY:

He did not steal me; but on the contrary he saved me from the men from the "Elephant Country" who were carrying me away.

BUCKINGHAM

Surely you could come up with a better tale than that? Come. Home.

EXT - VILLAGE 2 - DAY

The group enter the village through the huge wooden log gate, coming to a collection of rude huts, fashioned from branches of trees covered with skins and grasses and sometimes plastered with mud. All about the camp is erected a wall of saplings pointed at the tops and fire hardened. The shelters for about 2000 people are built very close together, and sometimes partially underground, like deep trenches, with the poles and hides above merely as protection from the sun and rain. The older part of the camp consists almost wholly of trenches, as though this was original form of dwellings which was slowly giving way to the drier and airier surface domiciles.

The men and women wear a single light skin about their hips. The men wear predator pelts. The hair of both men and women is confined by a rawhide thong passing about the forehead and tied behind, decorated with feathers, flowers, or the tails of small mammals. All wear necklaces of the teeth or claws of wild beasts, and numerous metal wristlets and anklets.

BUCKINGHAM

Look, I have captured the enemy. No one can stand before my power. I have taken his weapons

They bind Turck to a small tree in the middle of a crooked street. The people greet Victory with every mark of respect as she hastens to a large hut near the center of the camp, disappearing inside. Presently she returns with a fine looking, white-haired woman who carries herself with a regal dignity that seems quite remarkable in a place of such primitive squalor. The people fall aside as she approaches, making a wide way for her and her daughter. The older woman addresses Turck. Buckingham stands nearby.

MOTHER:

My daughter has told me of the manner in which you rescued her from the men of the elephant country. If Wettin lived you would be well treated, but Buckingham has taken me now, and is king. You can hope for nothing from such a beast as Buckingham. Bucking-ham is a pig, He is a coward. He came upon Wettin from behind and ran his spear through him. He will not be king for long. Some one will make a face at him, and he will run away and jump into the river.

The people titter and clap their hands. Buckingham flushes.

MOTHER:

If he dared, he would kill me now, but he does not dare. He is too great a coward. If I could help you I should gladly do so. But I am only queen--the vehicle that has helped carry down, unsullied, the royal blood from the days when Grabritin was a mighty country."

The old queen's words had a noticeable effect upon the mob of curious savages which surrounded me. The moment they discovered that the old queen was friendly to me and that I had rescued her daughter they commenced to accord me a more friendly interest, and I heard many words spoken in my behalf, and demands were made that I not be harmed.

BUCKINGHAM

(Blustering and storming) Back to your huts, peasants. You two women, go to your hut, stay there. Come, we will. confine the enemy in a dugout close to my shelter.

Two savages drag Turck away. Buckingham following. A little girl follows.

INT - DUGOUT - DAY
Turck lands hard as the savages throw him inside. One ties his ankles together. With grunts the savages leave.

BUCKINGHAM

The spirits have been kind. It could have taken many days to capture an enemy but you fell into my hands. Now I do not need the old woman. I can have Victory. And you shall die.

Kicking Turck in the side Buckingham leaves, laughing.

EXT _ DUGOUT _ DAY
The girl hides as Buckingham walks away. Looking after him she hesitates, then scurries into the dugout.

INT - DUGOUT - DAY
The girl crawl close to Turck staring at him.

TURCK:

Who are you, little girl?

MARY:

My name is Mary. I am Victory's sister.

TURCK:

And who is Victory?

MARY:

You do not know who Victory is? You saved her from the elephant country people, and yet you say you do not know her!

TURCK:

Oh, so she is Victory, and you are her sister! I have not heard her name before. That is why I did not know whom you meant. Will you do something for me, Mary?

MARY:

If I can.

TURCK:

Go to your mother, the queen, and ask her to come to me. I need to warn her about Buckingham.

MARY:

I will.

EXT - DUGOUT - DAY
Mary emerges and runs to the queen's hut.

INT - QUEEN'S HUT - DAY
Mary bursts in to see Victory huddled on the floor, her face bruised, Buckingham standing over her. Mother stands near the back wall.

BUCKINGHAM

You have angered me. I will not let you go. You will be my woman when the old bitch is dead. But first I will teach you to obey.

Buckingham slaps Victory again and again. Mary leaps on Buckingham's back, hitting him with her fists.

MARY:

You leave Victory alone.

BUCKINGHAM

You little bitch. Let go of me.

Buckingham drags Mary around and throws her across the hut where she falls limp.

MOTHER:

No!

Victory throws herself over Mary's body, taking a kick in the side aimed at the child. Mother scratches at Buckingham's face. He punches her in the face, lifts her over his head and body slams her on some pottery. Mother screams once and lies still. Buckingham staggers back. Victory cradles her mother's head and brings her hand out bloody.

VICTORY:

She's dead. Murderer.

BUCKINGHAM

Silence! or I will kill you and take Mary as my woman.

Victory shuts up fast.

BUCKINGHAM

You stay here until I return. I will make ready for our mating.

Buckingham leaves.

EXT - QUEEN'S HUT - DAY
Buckingham motions to the men.

BUCKINGHAM

You two, watch this door. No one is to leave. You two, drag out the old woman's body, she is dead.

The men enter the hut.

INT - QUEEN'S HUT - DAY
Victory and Mary whirl around and sit with their backs to the wall. The men drag the body outside. The two women turn back to digging under the wall.

VICTORY:

You must escape, Mary. I will not let Buckingham have you.

MARY:

I won't leave you. Buckingham will kill you.

VICTORY:

No, he needs me if he can't have you, but I cannot protect you from him. So you must leave.

In silence they continue to dig.

EXT - QUEEN'S HUT - EVENING

BUCKINGHAM

People, assemble now. The old queen is dead. We will bring the enemy to the Camp of the Lions and sacrifice him so I may mate with Victory.

The people set up a loud wailing and lamentation for the Queen. Buckingham watches for a while in disgust. Mary sneaks out from behind the queen's hut and cautiously runs off.

INT - DUGOUT - NIGHT
A figure appears, silhouetted against the lesser darkness beyond the doorway. It crept inside the hut.

MARY:

Are you here?

TURCK:

Mary! You are a good girl. You have come back, after all. I had commenced to think that you would not. Did you give my message to the queen? Will she come? Where is she?

The child's sobs increased, and she flung herself upon the dirt floor of the hut, apparently overcome by grief.

TURCK:

What is it? Why do you cry?

MARY:

The queen, my mother, will not come to you. She is dead. Buckingham has killed her. Now he will take Victory, for Victory is queen. He kept us fastened up in our shelter, for fear that Victory would escape him, but I dug a hole beneath the back wall and got out. I came to you, because you saved Victory once before, and I thought that you might save her again, and me, also. Tell me that you will.

TURCK:

I am bound and helpless, Mary. Otherwise I would do what I could to save you and your sister.

MARY:

I will set you free! I will set you free, and then you may come and slay Buckingham.

TURCK:

Gladly!

MARY:

We must hurry for Buckingham will be after you soon. He must make an offering to the lions at dawn before he can take Victory. The taking of a queen requires a human offering!

TURCK:

And I am to be the offering?

MARY:

Yes! Buckingham has been wanting a sacrifice ever since he killed Wettin, that he might slay my mother and take Victory.

Mary labors with the thongs that confine Turck. They defy her tender, childish fingers.

TURCK:

Hurry. They may be on their way here now.

MARY:

I'm hurrying but these knots are so tight.

EXT - DUGOUT - NIGHT
A parade of people approach down the trench.

INT - DUGOUT - NIGHT

TURCK:

They are here. Mary, hide in a corner, lest you be discovered and punished. There is naught else you can do.

Mary crawls away and hides under some hides in the corner. Buckingham and two warriors enter.

BUCKINGHAM

Where are you, enemy?

Buckingham advances slowly, kicking out viciously before him. Finally he kicks Turck in the face.

BUCKINGHAM

There you are, enemy. I knew you could not hide from me. Pick him up and bring him along.

The warriors jerk Turck him up to his feet. One of the men severs the bonds that hold Turck's ankles. The two haul Turck through the low doorway.

EXT - DUGOUT - NIGHT
They travel along the trench. A party of forty or fifty warriors await at the brink of the excavation some hundred yards from the hut. Hands drag the group to the surface.

EXT - FOREST - NIGHT
Through the underbrush wet with dew, the group make their way, lighted by a score of torch bearers who shy away from the dark which is filled with the roars of lions. Yellow-green eyes blaze wickedly from out the darkness.

EXT - CAMP OF THE LIONS - DAWN
With the pale light heralding dawn they reach an open place in the midst of a tangled wildwood. Here rises in crumbling grandeur a single, time-worn arch of masonry.

BUCKINGHAM

The entrance to the Camp of the Lions!

Here the party kneels. Buckingham raises his arms.

BUCKINGHAM

Lord of Grabritin, we
Fall on our knees to thee,
This gift to bring
Greatest of kings are thou!
To thee we humbly bow!
Peace to our camp allow.
God save thee, king!

The party rises and drags Turck to the crumbling arch, tying him to a huge, corroded, copper ring dangling from an eyebolt imbedded in the masonry. The party move off with the lions following. When they disappear in the brush, Turck struggles to tear loose from his bonds, but succeeds only in tightening them. He stops exhausted.

Majestically and noiselessly upon his padded feet a lion moves slowly toward Turck. The lion is halfway across the clearing when Victory leaps up beside him, carrying his rifle and revolver. She drops his weapons at his feet, and, snatching her knife from her belt, severs his bonds. The lion charges. Turck kneels and seizes his rifle.

TURCK:

Run.

VICTORY:

No, I will stay with you.

Turck whips the rifle to his shoulder and fires. The beast crumples and rolls, lifeless, to the ground. Turck takes the girl's hand and kisses it. She smiles and lays her other hand upon his head.

VICTORY:

You have strange customs in your country.

TURCK:

I can not but smile when I think how strange it would seem to my countrymen could they but see me kneeling there on the site of London, kissing the hand of England's queen. And now, you must return to the safety of your camp. I will go with you until you are near enough to continue alone in safety. Then I shall try to return to my comrades.

VICTORY:

I will not return to the camp.

TURCK:

But what shall you do?

VICTORY:

I do not know. Only I shall never go back while Buckingham lives. I should rather die than go back to him. Mary came to me, after they had taken you from the camp, and told me. I found your strange weapons and followed with them. It took me a little longer, for often I had to hide in the trees that the lions might not get me, but I came in time, and now you are free to go back to your friends.

TURCK:

And leave you here?

VICTORY:

Of course.

TURCK:

I cannot leave you, of course, but what in the world I am I to do, cumbered with the care of a young woman, and a queen at that?

Victory points to her knife.

VICTORY:

I am entirely competent to protect myself.

The sound of voices come from the forest.

VICTORY:

They are searching for me. Where shall we hide?

TURCK:

Would they follow us there?

Turck points through the archway into the Camp of the Lions.

VICTORY:

Never. For, in the first place, they would know that we would not dare go there, and in the second they themselves would not dare.

TURCK:

Then we shall take refuge in the Camp of the Lions.

VICTORY:

(shuddering) You dare?

TURCK:

Why not? We shall be safe from Buckingham, and you have seen, for the second time in two days, that lions are harmless before my weapons. Then, too, I can find my friends easiest in this direction, for the River Thames runs through this place you call the Camp of the Lions, and it is farther down the Thames that my friends are awaiting me. Do you not dare come with me?

VICTORY:

I dare follow wherever you lead.

They pass beneath the great arch into the city of London.

EXT - LONDON STREET - DAY
As they enter deeper into what had once been the city, the evidences of man's past occupancy become more frequent. For a mile from the arch lies only a riot of weeds and undergrowth and trees covering small mounds and little hillocks formed of the ruins of stately buildings of the dead past. But presently shattered walls still raise their crumbling tops in sad silence above the grass-grown sepulchers of their fallen fellows. Softened and mellowed by ancient ivy stand these sentinels of sorrow, their scarred faces still revealing the rents and gashes of shrapnel and of bomb.

EXT - ROYAL PALACE - DAY
Rounding the base of a large pile of grass-covered debris, they come upon the best preserved ruin. The entire lower story and part of the second story of what must once have been a splendid public building rises from a great knoll of shrubbery and trees, while ivy, thick and luxuriant, climbs upward to the summit of the broken walls. In many places the gray stone is still exposed, its smoothly chiseled face pitted with the scars of battle. The massive portal yawn, somber and sorrowful, giving a glimpse of marble halls within.

INT - ROYAL PALACE - DAY
They enter the rotunda of the great building. Pieces of massive furniture of another day still stand where man had placed them centuries ago. They are littered with dust and broken stone and plaster. Splendid tapestries, now mildewed and rotting, hang upon the walls. Mural paintings depict great historic events of the past. For the first time Victory saw the likeness of a horse, and she was much affected by a huge oil which depicted some ancient cavalry charge against a battery of field guns.

TURCK:

Come! I do not know the name by which this great pile was known, nor the purposes it fulfilled. It may have been the palace of your sires, Victory. From some great throne within, your forebears may have directed the destinies of half the world. Come!

VICTORY:

For the first time I begin to realize something of the magnificence and power of the race from whose loins I have sprung. I would like to remain here for the rest of my life where I could look at those pictures daily.

INT - THRONE ROOM - DAY
They emerge into a mighty chamber, dark and gloomy, for its high and narrow windows are choked and clogged by ivy. A low growl from the far end brings them to a startled halt. Upon a raised dais at the end of the hall stand two great chairs, highbacked and with great arms.

TURCK:

The throne of England! But what are those strange forms about it?

VICTORY:

The lions!

Sprawled about the dais are a dozen huge forms, while upon the seat of one of the thrones a small cub lies curled in slumber. A great male rises slowly to his feet. His devilish eyes bore straight through the semi-darkness. He opens his giant jaws and rumbles forth a warning roar. Instantly eight or ten of the other beasts leap to their feet. The foremost beast breaks into a slow trot, and at his heels come the others. All are roaring and the din of their great voices reverberate through the halls and corridors of the palace. The leader charges. Three sharp cracks of a rifle, send three lions to the floor.

VICTORY:

This way! Here is a door,

INT - HALLWAY - DAY
From a tiny antechamber at the foot of a narrow stone staircase they back up the stairs, Victory leading, as the first of the remaining lions leap from the throne room and spring for the stairs. Again Turck fires, but others of the ferocious beasts leap over their fallen fellows and pursue them. The stairs are very narrow--that is all that saves them--for as Turck backs slowly upward, but a single lion could attack at a time, and the carcasses impede the rushes of the others.At last they reach the top. Directly behind them is a door, tightly closed.

TURCK:

Try that door. See if it will open.

She runs up to it and pushes.

TURCK:

Turn the knob!

VICTORY:

What is a knob?

TURCK:

Flatten against the wall.

Turck puts a bullet in the spine of an approaching lion and leaps to Victory's side. The door resists his first efforts to swing it inward. Rusted hinges and swollen wood hold it tightly closed. But at last it gives, and just as another lion mounts to the top of the stairway the door swings in, and Turck pushes Victory across the threshold. The lions attack again. One lion falls in his tracks, another stumbles to fall at Turck's feet, and then he leaps within and Victory slams the door.

INT - OFFICE - DAY
Across the room, between two windows, stands a flat-topped desk. Bleached human bones--the skull, collar bones, arms, and a few of the upper ribs of a man lie inside the dust of a decayed military cap and blouse. In a chair before the desk are other bones, while more still strew the floor beneath the desk and about the chair. Beneath the desk are a pair of spurred military boots, green and rotten with decay containing the leg bones of a man. Among the tiny bones of the hands is an ancient fountain pen, as good, apparently, as the day it was made, and a metal covered memoranda book, closed over the bones of an index finger. Turck picks up the metal covered memoranda book. Its pages are rotten and stuck together. Only here and there is a sentence or a part of a sentence legible.

VICTORY:

What is that?

TURCK:

It is a diary. I can only read a little of what is written, it is so rotten Look, here it says "His majesty left for Tunbridge Wells today, he . . . jesty was stricken . . . terday. God give she does not die . . . am military governor of Lon . . ." Here, a little bit further on. "It is awful . . . hundred deaths today . . . worse than the bombardm . . ." And here at the end. "I promised his maj . . . e will find me here when he ret . . . alone. The most legible passage is on the next page: "Thank God we drove them out. There is not a single . . . man on British soil today; but at what awful cost. I tried to persuade Sir Phillip to urge the people to remain. But they are mad with fear of the Death, and rage at our enemies. He tells me that the coast cities are packed . . . waiting to be taken across. What will become of England, with none left to rebuild her shattered cities!" Here's the last entry. ". . . alone. Only the wild beasts . . . A lion is roaring now beneath the palace windows. I think the people feared the beasts even more than they did the Death. But they are gone, all gone, and to what? How much better conditions will they find on the continent? All gone--only I remain. I promised his majesty, and when he returns he will find that I was true to my trust, for I shall be awaiting him. God save the King!" That is all. This brave and forever nameless officer died nobly at his post--true to his country and his king. It was the Death, no doubt, that took him. This is yours as the last queen of England.

Turck hands the book to Victory who stares at it. He looks out the windows and can discover no lions. The stems of the ivy which clamber upward past the window of the room are as large around as an arm.

TURCK:

The vines will support our weight, and as we can gain nothing by remaining longer in the palace, I suggest we descend by way of the ivy and follow along down the river in the direction of the launch. Do you think you can climb down?

VICTORY:

I assure you that I can indeed descend the ivy without assistance.

EXT - PALACE WALL - DAY
Turck swings outward and begins to descend, and had come to within a few feet of the ground, being just opposite a narrow window, when he is startled by a savage growl and a great taloned paw darts from the aperture The snarling face of a lion is just within the embrasure. Releasing his hold on the ivy, Turck drops the remaining distance to the ground, saved from laceration only because the lion's paw strikes the thick stem of ivy. The lion leaps back and forth from the floor at the broad window ledge, tearing at the masonry with his claws in a vain attempt to reach his prey. But the opening is too narrow, and the masonry too solid. Victory is just above the window, and, as the lion reappears, growling and snarling, Turck puts a .33 bullet in his face, and at the same moment Victory slips quickly past him, dropping into Turck's upraised arms.

The roaring of the beast that had discovered the pair, together with the report of the rifle, had set the balance of the fierce inmates of the palace into the most frightful uproar.

TURCK:

They'll be after us soon. Let's go.

They run for the river.

EXT - RIVER - DAY
They reach the river as a lion bounds around the corner of the palace and stands looking about as though searching. Following, come others, while Victory and Turck crouch behind a clump of bushes close to the bank of the river. The beasts sniff about the ground for a while, but they do not chance upon the spot beneath the window that had given escape.

Presently a black-maned male raises his head, and, with cocked ears and glaring eyes, gazes straight at the bush behind which they hide. But, after a long, tense moment he looks away, and turns to glare in another direction.

They breathe a sigh of relief, their cheeks almost touching as they peer through the same small opening in the foliage. As their heads turn simultaneously, their lips brush together. Victory and Turck are startled by their kiss. They spring apart. A lioness, with keener eyes than her lord and master, discovers them. She trots toward their place of concealment, growling and baring her yellow fangs. Turck hesitates for an instant, then fires at her, but the bullet, though it strikes her full in the breast, doesn't stop her.

Screaming with pain and rage, the creature fairly flies toward them. Behind her come other lions. Turck drags Victory into the river. Victory strikes out with a strong, overhand stroke. That lioness stands for a moment glaring, then like a shot spring into the river and swims swiftly after them.

TURCK:

Swim for the other shore!

Turck is hampered by his rifle, having to swim with one hand while clinging to the weapon with the other. Victory, seeing the lioness take to the water and also that Turck is swimming much more slowly than she drops back to his side.

TURCK:

Go on! Make for the other shore, and then follow down until you find my friends. Tell them that I sent you, and with orders that they are to protect you. Go on! Go on!

But she only waits until they are again swimming side by side, her long knife between her teeth.

TURCK:

Do as I tell you!

VICTORY:

I will not leave you.

The lioness overhauls them rapidly, silently, her chin just touching the water, but blood streams from between her lips. Turck, treading water, raises his rifle above his head and wait for the lioness.

Victory swims away. Turck clubs the animal a terrific blow upon the skull. Victory, her long blade flashing in her hand, strikes the beast, but a great paw falls on her shoulder. Turck is swept beneath the surface of the water like a straw before the prow of a freighter. Still clinging to his rifle, he rises again, to see the lioness struggling in her death throes but an arm's length from him. The beast turns on her side, struggles frantically for an instant, and then sinks.

Victory is nowhere in sight. Alone, Turck floats on the bosom of the Thames.

TURCK:

Victory!

She suddenly surfaces, breaking into a grin.

VICTORY:

You are not dead! I have been searching the bottom for you. I was sure that the blow she gave you must have disabled you,

TURCK:

She is gone. Dead.

VICTORY:

The blow you struck her with the thing you call rifle stunned her and then I swam in close enough to get my knife into her heart.

TURCK:

I do not think I should care to return to London.

They strike out for the opposite shore.

EXT - FOREST - DAY
Turck and Victory trudge along an animal trail. Victory stops and points at a deer.

VICTORY:

Antelope! Food. I am hungry. Shoot it.

Turck raises his rifle to shoot but the buck leaps into the air and falls before he can fire.

VICTORY:

Truly that is magic.

TURCK:

Nonsense I did not fire.

The report of a gun sounds. Turck leaps to the ground and drags Victory down with him.

VICTORY:

What is wrong? Why do we hide? Why do we not get the food?

TURCK:

Because I did not shoot the deer. Someone else did. And I do not know who. We'll wait and see who comes to claim his prize.

The head and shoulders of a man appear above the crest of the knoll, Turck springs to his feet, with a heartfelt cry of joy, for it is Delcarte.

TURCK:

It is my friends. Delcarte! It's me, Jefferson Turck!

At the sound of Turck's voice, Delcarte half raises his rifle, but a moment later he recognizes Turck, and runs rapidly to meet them. Behind him comes Snider.

DELCARTE:

Captain, it is you. I'm astounded to see you on the north bank of the river, and much more so at the sight of your companion.

TURCK:

Allow me to introduced to you Lieutenant Delcarte and seaman Snider. Gentlemen, this is Victory, the queen of England.

SNIDER:

Great joke, Captain. Now who is she, really?

TURCK:

She is the queen of England and you will treat her accordingly. Do I make myself clear?

SNIDER:

Aye, aye, sir.

DELCARTE:

It is an extreme pleasure, ma'am, to make your acquaintance.

SNIDER:

Captain, we followed you inshore when you did not return from the hunt. We met the men of the elephant country, and had a short and one-sided battle with the fellows. Afterward we returned to the launch with a prisoner, from whom we learned you had probably been captured by the men of the lion country.

DELCARTE:

With the prisoner as a guide we set off up-river in search of you, but were much delayed by motor trouble, and had finally camped after dark.

TURCK:

You must have camped a half mile above the spot where Victory and I spent the night. You must have passed us in the dark.

SNIDER:

Why did you not hear the sound of the propeller?

TURCK:

I do not know, unless you passed us at a time when the lions were making an unusually earsplitting din upon the opposite side.

Taking the antelope they return to the launch.

EXT - LAUNCH - EVENING
Taylor is as delighted to see Turck alive again as Delcarte had been.

TAYLOR

Captain, it is good to see you. You would not believe the trouble we have had getting more chemical fuel. But I did find more of those Potatoes and made some more this morning. Oh, by the way, Captain. This is Thirty-Six.

TURCK:

What?

TAYLOR

That's his name. Could be an ancestor's serial number.

DELCARTE:

Or the number of a military regiment from long ago.

SNIDER:

Or his Intelligence Quotient.

TURCK:

Belay that, Snider.

THIRTY-SIX

I am ready to die now.

DELCARTE:

Our prisoner is from the elephant country. Notwithstanding the fact that we have assured him to the contrary, he still thinks you will kill him.

TURCK:

Thirty-Six, we will not kill you. You may go if you promise not to attack us or bring others to attack us.

THIRTY-SIX

You will not kill me? I will stay.

TURCK:

Now that I have returned, we must make some plans.

SNIDER:

I'm all for going home, for setting out to sea and returning to Pan-America.

DELCARTE:

Don't be a fool, Snider. We would not last three weeks, much less the three months we would have to sail.

TAYLOR

Delcarte's right, we could not carry enough water to last more than a month with five of us on board.

SNIDER:

To remain in England, constantly menaced by wild beasts and men equally as wild, is just about as bad.

TURCK:

I suggest we cross the Channel and ascertain if we can discover a more enlightened and civilized people upon the continent. I am sure that some trace of the ancient culture and greatness of Europe must remain. Germany, probably, will be much as it was during the twentieth century, for, I am positive that Germany has been victorious in the Great War.

SNIDER:

It is bad enough to have come this far. I do not want to make it worse by going to the continent. I'm not going. Who knows if they will be civilized or barbarians?

TURCK:

I have finally lost my patience, Snider. From no on you will do what you are told. I am in command of this party, and you all shall consider yourselves under my orders, as though we were still aboard the COLDWATER and in Pan-American waters. Is that clear?

DELCARTE:

(saluting) Aye, aye, Captain. We are as ready to follow and obey here as on the other side of thirty.

TAYLOR

(saluting) Perfectly Clear, Captain.

VICTORY:

(saluting badly) Aye, aye, Captain.

Delcarte and Taylor laugh. Turck smiles. Victory, not understanding, laughs also. Snider says nothing, but wears a sullen scowl.

VICTORY:

I am all for going to the continent, or anywhere else, in fact, where I might see new sights and experience new adventures. Afterward we can come back to Grabritin and if Buckingham is not dead and we can catch him away from his men and kill him, then I can return to my people, and we can all live in peace and happiness.

THIRTY-SIX

I, too, will go with you, if you promise not to let them slay me.

TURCK:

I, for one, do not intend to harm you in any way.

DELCARTE:

That goes for me, too.

TAYLOR

That pretty much makes it unanimous.

TURCK:

That done, we leave in the morning. I'll take the first watch, Delcarte, you will take second and Taylor you will take third. Good night.

Turck walks off with his rifle and takes his post. Victory follows and sits at his knee.

VICTORY:

What means civilized or barbarian? Please, explain the difference between the two.

TURCK:

Well, civilization is the state of man when he lives by law and in peace with his fellow man. Barbarity is the state of lawlessness and chaos which is exhibited by primitive peoples.

VICTORY:

But what does civilized man look like?

TURCK:

Well, he looks like Delcarte, or Taylor or even me.

VICTORY:

And a barbarian man?

TURCK:

He, uh, dresses like Thirty-Six or Buckingham.

Victory breaks into a gay little laugh.

VICTORY:

Oh, then I am a barbarian!

TURCK:

You are, indeed, a barbarian. A most beloved barbarian.

Turck kisses Victory, pulling her into his arms. They break apart and stare at each other then snuggle down and watch the fire. For some time thereafter she sits in silence, apparently deep in thought. Finally she looks up at Turck, her strong white teeth gleaming behind her smiling lips.

VICTORY:

Should you take that thing you call 'razor,' and cut the hair from the face of Thirty-six, and exchange garments with him, you would be the barbarian and Thirty-six the civilized man. There is no other difference between you, except your weapons. Clothe you in a wolfskin, give you a knife and a spear, and set you down in the woods of Grabritin--of what service would your civilization be to you?

TURCK:

My civilization made it easy for me to save your hide several times.

VICTORY:

Ha, It was I who saved you.

TURCK:

Don't be a fool. I am not some ignorant little barbarian and I will not be mocked by you.

VICTORY:

Then this little barbarian will leave you alone.

Victory rises and stalks back to the camp with the innate royalty of her birth.

TURCK:

Victory. Damn.

Snider looks up from his bedroll as Victory crawl into her bed, sniffling. He smiles wickedly and drops off to sleep again.

EXT - LAUNCH - MORNING
The crew rouse out of bed quickly, except for Snider.

TAYLOR

Rise and shine you swabs. It's oh-dawn-thirty. Time to meet another day. You, too, Snider. Hit the deck.

SNIDER:

Lemme alone.

TURCK:

Snider!

SNIDER:

All right. I'm up. I'm up.

VICTORY:

Leave him alone, you bully.

TURCK:

Stay out of this, Victory. It does not concern you.

VICTORY:

Because I am a barbarian?

TURCK:

No, that's not it. It's just...

VICTORY:

I understand, Captain. Aye, aye, Captain.

She turns and rolls up her bedroll. Turck looks after her.

EXT - LAUNCH - DAY
The prow of the launch slides away from the beach and Taylor leaps into the boat. Turck is at the helm.

TURCK:

Taylor, stow the rope. Delcarte, Snider set the sail.

Snider is slow to help and Delcarte almost drops the mast. Turck grabs a short piece of rope with a Turks's head knot at one end.

TURCK:

Snider, if that sail hits the water, I will personally flog you with this rope's end.

Snider leaps to grab the mast and helps Delcarte set it in the hole.

DELCARTE:

Thanks, Snider.

Snider snorts.

TURCK:

Victory, would you like to steer the boat?

VICTORY:

No, thanks.

TURCK:

Snider, take the helm.

Turck sits down beside Victory as Snider slides behind the wheel. Victory rises and moves to the front of the launch. Turck follows Victory to the bow.

TURCK:

Please, Victory. I want to...

Victory turns away quickly and sits beside Snider in the small wheel well.

VICTORY:

Will you teach me to steer the boat, Snider?

DELCARTE:

Be patient, Captain. It will work itself out.

TURCK:

I know, she's taken to his company solely for the purpose of piquing me. Well let her.

Turck turns to his maps. Delcarte and Taylor exchange glances.Snider takes full advantage of his opportunity. Often he leans toward Victory to whisper in her ear, and he laughs a lot. Taylor teaches Thirty-six how to tie a bowline knot. Victory suddenly stands up and marches to the prow.

EXT - RHINE - DAY
Nature has reclaimed what man had once stolen from her and defiled. A herd of zebras grazes An antelope rests peacefully in a bed of daisies. They land upon the west bank of the river. Snider leaps out of the launch with the land line and falls with a cry.

SNIDER:

My ankle. I think it's broke.

TURCK:

All right. We need meat and the fastest way to get it is a massive hunting party. Taylor, Delcarte, we will go separate ways and find a deer. Snider and Thirty-six will guard Victory and the launch. Delcarte, Taylor, let's go shoot something. Be back before dark.

They tramp away from the river. Snider watches as the others disappear into the woods. He wrestles himself into a seated position.

VICTORY:

Thirty-six, help me make him more comfortable.

Thirty-six helps her drag Snider to a rock and lean him against it. Snider grabs Victory's arm, grimacing. He presses a revolver to Thirty-six's chest and pulls the trigger. The report is a muffled whump and Thirty-Six falls. Victory tries to escape but Snider hits her in the head with the but of the revolver. He picks her up and throw her into the launch which he pushes out into the current. Thirty-Six looks up at the launch, seeing only that the two are sitting close together, Victory's head on Snider's shoulder.

EXT - FOREST - DAY
Turck brings down a deer. Across the meadow a savage appears and stares at Turck. Delcarte and Taylor appear. The savage disappears.

TURCK:

Did you see him?

DELCARTE:

We saw no one. Where was he?

TURCK:

Never mind, he's probably miles away by now. Any way here's dinner. Come, let's get it home. I'm starved.

EXT. FOREST - DAY
The deer swings from a sling as Delcarte and Taylor follow Turck. They arrive at the camp before they notice anything amiss with the camp.

TAYLOR

Where's the launch?

DELCARTE:

Where's Snider?

TURCK:

Where's Victory? There's Thirty-Six.

Turck raises the Grabritin's head in his arms. Thirty-Six moans.

TURCK:

He is not dead, but he is badly injured Get me some water.

TAYLOR

(handing over a canteen) That savage you saw. He must have surprised the camp and wounded Thirty-six and taken the rest prisoner.

Delcarte shatters Taylor's theory by a single movement of the hand. He draws aside the lion's skin that covers half of the Grabritin's breast, revealing a neat, round hole in Thirty-six's chest-- a hole that could have been made by no other weapon than a pistol.

TURCK:

Snider!

Delcarte nods. At about the same time the eyelids of the wounded man flutter. He looks up and very slowly the light of consciousness returns to his eyes.

TURCK:

What happened, Thirty-six?

Thirty-six tries to reply, but the effort causes him to cough.

THIRTY-SIX

Snider--They--went--back.

Thirty-Six dies.

TAYLOR

No one wants to believe this. but I think Victory and Snider have stolen the launch, and deserted us. We are lost.

TURCK:

Taylor, buck up. There's no need to look so glum. We will follow them, and the chances are that we shall overtake them. They will not travel as rapidly as Snider probably hopes. He will be forced to halt for fuel and for food, and the launch must follow the windings of the river; we can take short cuts while they are traversing the detour. I have my map--thank God! I always carry it upon my person--and with that and the compass we will have an advantage over them. But first we will bury Thirty-Six. We owe him that.

EXT - FOREST - DAY
Montage of movement through the forest and by the river. Flashing silhouettes in the branches, Boots splashing through puddles. etc. Finally a pause at the edge of a river bend.

TURCK:

Halt, we'll rest here for a while. We have had a hard day of it

TAYLOR

(whispering to Delcarte) And, if the truth were known, I think that we have no hope of overtaking the launch other than by the merest accident.

DELCARTE:

Quiet, he might hear you.

Turck hears.

TURCK:

Set up camp. I'll fill the canteens.

Turck walks down to the water to fill the canteens. He pushes the canteens under the water. They bubble merrily. The launch floats around the bend. Turck does not notice it. Taylor emerges from the woods and drops his load of firewood.

TAYLOR

The launch!

DELCARTE:

The launch is floating down-river from above us. How did we pass it? And how are we to reach it now, should Snider and the girl discover us?

TAYLOR:

It's drifting. I see no one in it.

Turck and Delcarte strip off their clothes

TURCK:

Taylor, remain on shore with the clothing and rifles. Shoot Snider should he show himself.

With powerful strokes they swim out in the path of the oncoming launch. Turck, far in the lead, reaches the center of the channel just as the launch arrives, drifting broadside on. Turck seizes the gunwale and raises himself quickly, so that his chin tops the side. Snider lies upon his back in the bottom of the boat alone, dead. Without examining him further, Turck starts the launch. Coming about, he picks up Delcarte.

TURCK:

Snider's dead.

DELCARTE:

Victory?

TURCK:

She's gone.

DELCARTE:

Snider's been dead for hours--he's cold. He's been stabbed, a slit about an inch in length-- such a slit as a sharp knife would make, and in the dead fingers of one hand is clutched a strand of long brown hair.

TURCK:

Victory's hair is brown.

DELCARTE:

The bastard must have attacked Victory and she defended her honor.

TURCK:

Throw him overboard, let the fishes have him.

DELCARTE:

You do not mean that, Captain. We are not barbarians.

Turck hangs his head.

TURCK:

All right, we'll bury him beside the Rhine in an unmarked grave. Beasts do not require headstones. Then we will find Victory and rescue her.

DELCARTE:

We had her wrong in our thoughts..and the least that we can do in expiation is to find and rescue her.

TURCK:

Take us back to shore. After the funeral, You Delcarte will retrace the launch's route on the east side of the river and I will take the west side. Taylor you will pace us in the launch.

EXT - RIVERSIDE - DAY
Turck discovers the remnants of a recent camp fire.

TURCK:

Heigh, Taylor! I found her campfire. Go across and get Delcarte. I'll wait here!

Turck watches as Taylor swings about and crosses the river. Delcarte is stepping into the launch when, without the least warning, four men seize him and snatch his rifle from his hands and his revolver from his belt. He struggles for an instant, but finding his efforts of no avail, ceases. He turns his head to look at his assailants. Several of them walk around in front of him. They are uniformed soldiery, armed with rifles, revolvers, and sabers, but with faces as black as coal.

TURCK:

Stay back until we know their intentions.

A gun butt hits Turck upside the head and the soldiers open fire on the launch. The launch spins about and flees at top speed but a bullet hits the chemical fuel tank and it explodes. Colonel BELIK rides up.

BELIK:

What happened?

OFFICER

We caught this slave with weapons. He had two friends in a motorized boat. Our bullets must have hit it's fuel tank.

BELIK:

Revive him and bring him with us.

Belik rides on as the soldiers pick up Turck.

EXT - FORT - DAY
In the center of a plain stands a log fort, with a block- house at each of its four corners. A herd of cavalry horses grazes under guard outside the walls of the post. Turck stumbles behind Belik and his guard as a troop of a hundred men follow them. A horn sounds as the troop approaches the gate which opens to admit them.

EXT - PARADE GROUND - AFTERNOON

The troop marches directly into the compound. Many soldiers look up from books and letters as the troop stops in front of the commandant's office.

COLONEL (in language)

Troop dismissed. Mail Call. Sergeant, deliver the mail. You, follow me.

The company disperses with the exception of a guard of four privates, who escorted Turck in the wake of the young officer who leads the way across a small parade ground, where a battery of light field guns is parked, and toward a log building, in front of which rises the flagstaff with a flag.

INT - COMMANDANT'S OFFICE - LATE AFTERNOON

Soldiers in the office leap to attention as the Colonel enters.

BELIK(in language)

I am Colonel Belik. I am heading to the eastern front. You will detach all but your first troop. I will be taking them with me.

COMMANDANT:

But how am I to defend the border against the barbarians?

BELIK:

That is your problem. You have your orders. I will take the slaves. Have them chained today. We will leave at dawn tomorrow. I do not want to be delayed by a chaining incident. Oh, I have brought in an escaped slave I captured on this side of the Rhine. Bring in your interpreter. I wish to question him.

A soldier salutes and exits.

COMMANDANT(in language)

How is the war going?

BELIK(in language)

As well as can be expected

The soldier reappears with the interpreter in tow.

BELIK(in language)

Ask him who his master is and where he belongs.

INTERPRETER(in language)

Yes, Colonel Master.

The interpreter turns to Turck and speaks in grunts and sign language.

TURCK:

Sorry, old man. I don't understand a word you've said. My name is Jefferson Turck, Captain in the Pan-American Navy. Serial number TK-427.

BELIK looks shocked.

INTERPRETER(in language)

Master, he will not answer. He uses a language I do not know. He is not Allman.

BELIK:

Very well, chain him with the other slaves.

EXT - PARADE GROUND - EVENING
The soldier leads Turck out to the parade ground where a number of whites are gathered under guard. He is pushed in the group. A couple of long chains are brought, with rings in the links every few feet. A couple of soldiers snap the first ring around the neck of a powerful white slave, and one by one the rest are herded to their places, and the work of shackling them neck to neck commences. Belik watches the procedure. Turck stands tall and does not shrink away from the soldiers as they lock the ring around his neck. Then the slaves are forced to sit down on the ground.

EXT - PARADE GROUND - DAWN
Soldiers parade through the slaves, poking and kicking them awake. The slaves slowly rise and form ranks. With a motion Belik leads the parade out of the fort.

EXT - FOREST - DAY
Montage of marching soldiers, falling prisoners and floggings of injured slaves who cannot rise. Turck helps another slave continue marching. Belik watches. Turck stares back as they pass the colonel. Belik motions to his orderly.

BELIK:

The new man will be my body servant. Release him when we get to the fort and take him to my quarters a half hour after you have cleaned him up.

INT - BELIK'S QUARTERS - NIGHT
A soldier escorts a freshly scrubbed and newly uniformed Turck into the room and leaves him standing in the center of the room, shutting the door as he leaves. Turck looks around and sees the room is spartanly decorated. A weapons harness hangs on the back of the door with pistol and sword in holster and scabbard. As Turck looks at the door. it opens and BELIK enters, stopping short as he sees Turck snap to attention and salute. Belik enters and closes the door, looking at the harness.

BELIK:

I knew you were very smart.

TURCK:

You speak English.

BELIK:

I was in the expeditionary force that landed in the north of the Isles. My first slave was a Grubbiten. I learned it from him. Soon our august emperor of Abyssinia will let me return with a proper force to civilize the isles. Would you prefer to remain at the post as my body servant

TURCK:

I have no desire to start out upon a march of unknown length, chained by the neck and driven by whips.

BELIK:

Quite. You will clean my room and keep my clothes in order and you will bunk down in that room. You may begin by polishing my harness.

Turck takes down the harness and removes the sword and gun placing them on the table. Belik points to a cabinet. Turck removes rags and oil from the cabinet.

COLONEL:

The yellow men from the east and north are contesting our rights here now, but we shall win--we shall conquer the world, carrying Christianity to all the benighted heathen of Europe, and Asia as well.

TURCK:

(Stops polishing) You are a Christian people?

The Colonel looks at Turck in surprise, nodding his head affirmatively.

TURCK:

I am a Christian.

BELIK:

Impossible. The people on the Isles are pagan. They will not be able to withstand the greatest empire the world has ever known.

TURCK:

But I am not from the British Isles. I am from Pan-America. My people are the most powerful nation on earth. My country covers both North and South America from pole to pole. Our cities number in the millions of population. Our army is ten million men strong

BELIK:

As is ours with ten to fifteen million white slaves.

BELIK:

Menelek XIV is the undisputed ruler of all the continent of Africa, of all of ancient Europe except the British Isles, Scandinavia, and eastern Russia, and has large possessions and prosperous colonies in what once were Arabia and Turkey in Asia. But I am much surprised to learn of your nation which lies across the ocean. So you are a captain in your nation's navy. How many slaves do you own?

TURCK:

We have no slaves. We have passed beyond keeping others in slavery. A free man working for a fair wage is much more dependable and definitely more loyal. Less than a third of our population is black. We have yellow and red citizens as well. All free. All equal.

BELIK:

It is difficult for me to believe your assertion that there are but few blacks in your country. Whites are inherently inferior beings, creatures of a lower order, and even the few white freemen of Abyssinia are never accorded anything approximating a position of social equality with the blacks. They live in the poorer districts of the cities, in little white colonies, and a black who marries a white is socially ostracized.

EXT - NEW GONDAR STREET - DAY
The town is gaily decorated with flags, streamers, gorgeous rugs, and banners. Troops are pouring out toward the east. An old slave is sweeping the dirt into little piles in the gutters of the street.

TURCK:

Where are all the soldiers going?

SLAVE:

Why, to fight the yellow men, of course. They have crossed the border, and are marching toward New Gondar.

TURCK:

Who will win?

SLAVE:

Who knows? I hope it will be the yellow men, but Menelek is powerful--it will take many yellow men to defeat him.

A horn sound in the distance. Crowds gather along the sidewalks

SLAVE:

The emperor is coming. All hail Emperor Menelek the fourteenth.

A spectacle of barbaric splendor passes down the broad main thoroughfare. At the head ride a regiment of red-coated hussars--enormous men, black as night followed by troops of riflemen mounted on camels. The emperor rides in a golden howdah upon the back of a huge elephant so covered with rich hangings and embellished with scintillating gems that scarce more than the beast's eyes and feet are visible. Menelek is a rather gross-looking man, well past middle age, but he carries himself with an air of dignity befitting one descended in unbroken line from the Prophet. Following the emperor came regiment after regiment from the various branches of the service, among them batteries of field guns mounted on elephants. In the center of the troops following the imperial elephant march a great caravan of slaves.

SLAVE:

They are gifts brought in from the far outlying districts by the commanding officers of the frontier posts. The majority of them are women, destined for the harems of the emperor and his favorites. It drives me mad to see those poor white women marching past to their horrid fates

TURCK:

I share your sentiments, but I am as powerless to alter their destinies as you

Turck and the slave turn away and do not see Victory march past her head high.

INT - TURCK'S QUARTERS - DAWN
Turck awakens to booming of cannon. He throws off his blankets and dresses quickly.

INT - BELIK'S QUARTERS - DAWN
Belik rouses as Turck bursts in.

BELIK:

It's come. The yellow men have pushed close.

EXT - CITY - MONTAGE OF DAYS
The enemy forces the imperial troops back upon the city. Dust covered couriers gallop in from the front. Fresh troops hasten from the city, and about noon Menelek rides out surrounded by his staff. Cannonading and the spitting of the small arms show the battle line scarce two leagues from New Gondar. The city fills with wounded. Just outside, soldiers engage in throwing up earthworks. The imperial troops fall back upon these new defenses. Shells fall within the city. The cannonade ceases. Menelek returns and takes up his headquarters in the stone palace.

INT - MENELEK'S HEADQUARTERS - DAY
Menelek enters with his staff. Belik rises from his desk, saluting.

MENELEK

We have it. A lull in the hostilities--a truce has been arranged. The enemy will not shoot at us for a week while we negotiate for peace.

BELIK:

The rapidity of our march and the fact that all available troops are being hastened toward the northeast assures me that a matter of vital importance to the empire is threatening or has already broken. I can not believe that a simple rising of the savage tribes of whites would necessitate the mobilizing of such a force as is presently converging on New Gondar.

MENELEK

The yellow men from the east are pressing on our borders. We have suffered many losses over the past few weeks. That is why I and you are here.

BELIK:

The moral effect upon your troops of your presence in the midst of battle, could not this exhilarated mental state, amounting almost to hysteria on the part of your imperial troops, weigh heavily against the soldiers of the east?

MENELEK

For fifty years my armies conquered wherever they marched. At first I had led them in person, lately my presence within a hundred miles of the battle line has been sufficient for large engagements--for minor ones only the knowledge that they were fighting for the glory of their sovereign was necessary to win victories. But now I am worried about their fidelity. The yellow men are a day's march from our gates and I must seal the men to me. That's why I am giving a banquet tonight

INT - BELIK'S QUARTERS - NIGHT
Turck enters the room carrying the Colonel's dress uniform.

BELIK:

Good, you're here. After I dress you will put on your best uniform. You will accompany me to the banquet and wait upon me.

INT - BANQUET HALL - NIGHT
The entertainment commences--musicians, dancing girls, jugglers, and the like. Turck stands behind his master in silent servility, now pouring his wine, now cutting up his meats for him, now fanning him with a large, plumed fan of feathers. But he looks daggers at the man's neck.

MENELEK

Soon we will attack the invaders and drive them back but first I must make sure of my officers and that is why I am making this gift. We will attack at dawn tomorrow.

BELIK:

You would break the truce?

MENELEK

I have already sent out troops to sabotage their artillery.

EXT - ARTILLERY - NIGHT
Menelek's soldiers creep up on the artillery and set charges but are shot down before they can destroy more than one cannon.

INT - BANQUET HALL - NIGHT

BELIK:

Then I must retire to rest for the battle. Pray excuse me.

MENELEK

If the rest of my officers were as loyal as you, I would have no need of this.

Menelek motions to the master of ceremonies. Belik rises and motions to Turck to follow.

MASTER OF CEREMONIES

My lords and officers of the armies of emperor, pray attend. The slave women who were presented to the emperor upon his arrival in New Gondar shall now be exhibited. The royal host will select such as he wishes, after which the great Menelek shall present the balance of them to his guests. Praise the royal generosity!

Amid cheers, a small door at one side of the room opens, and the poor creatures file in and are ranged in a long line facing the throne. Belik and Turck approach the exit.

MASTER OF CEREMONIES

Prostrate yourselves before the emperor.

The women fall to their knees before him, touching their foreheads to the floor.

MASTER OF CEREMONIES

Down, slave! Make obeisance to your sovereign!

A single, straight, slim figure stands erect in the center of the line of prostrate girls, her arms folded across her breast and little chin in the air. Belik and Turck stop and look.

MASTER OF CEREMONIES

Down! Down!

The Master of Ceremonies takes a step toward her and half draws his sword. Turck Instinctively takes a step forward. But at the same instant Menelek raises his hand in a gesture that halts the officer.

MENELEK:

Let us inquire why this young woman refuses to do homage to her sovereign.

VICTORY:

I go on my knees to no one. I have no sovereign. I myself am sovereign in my own country.

Menelek, at her words, leans back in his throne and laughs uproariously. Following his example, the assembled guests vie with one another in an effort to laugh more noisily than the emperor. The girl tilts her chin a bit higher in the air--even her back proclaims her utter contempt for her captors. Finally Menelek restores quiet by the simple expedient of a frown.

MENELEK:

And who are you, and by what name is your country called?

VICTORY:

I am Victory, Queen of Grabritin.

Once more Turck starts toward her, but better judgment holds him back.

MENELEK:

And you will not bend the knee to me?

Victory shakes her head in a most decided negation.

MENELEK:

You shall be my first choice, then. I like your spirit, for the breaking of it will add to my pleasure in you, and never fear but that it shall be broken-- this very night. Take her to my apartments

Belik pulls Turck back from the doors as Victory follows the soldiers off in apparent quiet submission. Belik and Turck follow them out the doors.

INT - PALACE HALLWAY - NIGHT
The soldiers move down the hall and Belik turns down the other way.

BELIK:

Poor child.

TURCK:

What do you mean?

BELIK:

Why, only that she--Silence, slave. Do not question your betters.

TURCK:

I am your equal.

BELIK:

Do not make me regret my leniency. Come and be quiet, or I will have you flogged.

TURCK:

You will not.

BELIK:

You defy me?

Turck does not answer. Belik raises his riding quirt and strikes Turck in the face. Turck retaliates immediately and Belik slumps to the floor. Turck sees he has not been observed and drags Belik into a side room. Moments later he emerges and follows the receding soldiers escorting Victory. They turn into a room guarded by a single sentry. Turck continues down the hall and hides in a doorway.

INT - CHINESE HEADQUARTERS - NIGHT
Officers enter with Menelek's soldiers in tow. MAN looks up.

MAN

Yes?

Chinese Officer

The blacks have broken the truce. These men blew up one of our cannons. They were armed to destroy them all.

MAN

Mobilize the troops. We will attack now.

Officer salutes.

INT - PALACE HALLWAY - NIGHT
Turck peers out and sees Menelek and his escort of guards march down the hall. They stop at the door and Menelek waves the escort away. The single guard snaps to attention as Menelek enters his room. The men who escorted Victory emerge and march off past Turck who hides in the doorway.

EXT - MILITARY POST MONTAGE - NIGHT
Soldiers wake and assemble. Cannons load Soldiers march out.

INT - PALACE HALLWAY - NIGHT
Turck emerges from hiding and walks with his head bowed in seeming servility toward the guard. As he passes Turck snatches the guard's rifle from his grasp, and, at the same time strikes him a terrific blow between the eyes. Turck clubs him with a single mighty blow using the but of the rifle. Turck bursts through the door.

INT - MENELEK'S QUARTERS - NIGHT
Turck stops with the gun at ready but the room is empty. He moves quietly towards a door in the far wall. He places his ear to the door and listens.

INT - MENELEK'S BEDROOM - NIGHT
Victory stands before Menelek, sneering.

VICTORY:

You are pathetic. Even Buckingham is better than you. At least he fights his own battles. You fight only through other men. You are even afraid of me. Coward!

She raises her bound hands in contempt. Menelek removes his weapons harness and sets it on the table beside him.

MENELEK

I will teach you to insult me.

Menelek slaps Victory.

MENELEK

Everyone underestimates me. Tomorrow I will crush the yellow men when I break the truce, but tonight I will crush your will to mine.

Turck pushes the door inward just in time to see Menelek seize the girl and flung her on the bed. He tears off his jacket.

MENELEK

You are mine. After I am through with you I will give you to my troops for a plaything.

TURCK:

No!

MENELEK:

What means this, slave? Out of here! Out of here! Quick, before I kill you!

Turck raises the rifle and pulls the trigger. At the same instant a deafening explosion detonates just outside the palace.

MENELEK

The guard's gun is unloaded. Do you think I would allow anyone the chance to assassinate me?

Menelek reaches for his pistol then realizes it is on the table across the room.

EXT - ARTILLERY - NIGHT
The yellow army loads and fires another cannon.

EXT - STREET - NIGHT
Another explosion, closer to the palace.

INT - ROOM - NIGHT
Belik wakes to the explosions. He staggers to his feet. and out the door.

INT - MENELEK'S BEDROOM
Turck rushes Menelek, striking him with the butt of the rifle. Menelek staggers back.

MENELEK

Guards!

The shelling comes continuously, drowning out Menelek's cries. Turck tries to hit Menelek again but Menelek grabs the rifle and they struggle about the room, striking one another, knocking over furniture, and rolling upon the floor. Suddenly the door bursts open

INT - PALACE HALLWAY - NIGHT
Belik staggers down the hall and sees the guard on the ground. He draws his pistol and bursts inside.

INT - MENELEK'S BEDROOM - NIGHT
Belik sees the fight and raises his pistol to shoot Turck in the back. Victory seizes the pistol from the table and leaps between Turck and Belik. She pulls the trigger but the gun clicks on an empty chamber. Belik laughs. Victory pulls the trigger again. The gun fires and Belik slaps his chest pulling a bloody hand away. He raises his pistol and falls. The shot distracts Turck who is thrown off by Menelek who grabs a chair and knocks Turck to the ground. Victory tries to shoot Menelek but he grabs the gun and knocks her down.

MENELEK

First I will have you flogged, slave, then I will please my self with her. Guards!

Guards rush in with bayonets fixed.

MENELEK

Tie him up to the bed and bring me a whip. Watch her.

Guards tie Turck to the bedpost and rip off his shirt. MENELEK takes the whip and snaps it a few times.

MENELEK

I assure you slave, this will hurt you more than it will hurt me.

He whips Turck, laughing. A rending crash above them, a deafening explosion within the chamber,.smoke and powder fumes fill the room and the roof falls in. Slowly the smoke clears to reveal the shattered remnants of the guard. Menelek lies with a ceiling bean crushing his chest. A great, jagged hole in the ceiling allows moonlight to illuminate the darkened room, revealing the floor and half of the wall toward the corridor has been blown entirely out. Victory rises and stands in the center of the demolished apartment looking at Turck.

TURCK:

Victory! Thank God that you are safe!

VICTORY:

Why did it have to be you who saved me! I hate you!

TURCK:

Hate me? Why should you hate me, Victory? I do not hate you. I--I--

VICTORY:

Why should I hate you? Because Snider told me--he told me that you had promised me to him, but he did not get me. I killed him, as I should like to kill you!

TURCK:

Snider lied! I love you, Victory. You must know that I love you--that I have always loved you, and that I never could have made so base a promise.

VICTORY:

You called me a barbarian! You could not love a barbarian.

TURCK:

But I do love a barbarian, Victory! The dearest barbarian in the world.

She raises her eyes to Turck's, and then her smooth, brown arms encircle his neck and draw his lips down to hers.

VICTORY:

I love you--I have loved you always. I have been so unhappy," she said, "but I could not die while I thought that you might live.

The ferocity of the bombardment increases to a continuous rumble that rains shells about the palace.

TURCK:

However I might not live if you don't untie me.

VICTORY:

Forgive me, love.

She unties him and they try to get out the door but the floor and wall are gone revealing a hole that goes all the way to the floor below. They go to the window and look outside.

EXT - PALACE WALL - DAWN
The wall is covered in ivy.

VICTORY:

At least there are no lions this time.

A shell explodes in the building opposite.

TURCK:

Perhaps, but those are not much better. Still, let's go.

They shinny down the vines, Victory reaching the ground first.

VICTORY:

What took you so long?

TURCK:

I'm just too civilized. I think I need some lessons in being a barbarian.

They cross the court, discovering upon the opposite side a number of wide, wooden doors set in the wall of the palace, with small windows between. As thy stand close behind one of the doors, listening, a horse within neighs.

TURCK:

The stables! We'll ride out of the city.

Turck pushes back a door and enters.

INT - STABLES - DAWN
Sounds of battle and the crack of thousands of rifles, yells of the soldiers, hoarse commands of officers, and the blare of bugles. The bombardment ceases suddenly.

EXT - CITY WALLS - DAWN
The enemy storms the city.

INT - STABLES - DAWN
Turck gropes about until he finds saddles and bridles for two horses, but he can find but a single mount.

TURCK:

They are storming the city. We've got to get out of here quickly. Help me saddle this horse.

They throw the saddle on the horse and mount. They spur out of the stable.

EXT - STREET - MORNING
They spur into chaos. Great multitudes of men, women, and children flee toward the west. Soldiers, afoot and mounted, join the mad exodus. Now and then a camel or an elephant pass bearing some officer or dignitary to safety. It is evident that the city will fall at any moment--a fact amply proclaimed by the terror-stricken haste of the fear- mad mob. Horse, camel, and elephant crush helpless women and children beneath their feet. A common soldier drags a general from his mount, and, leaping to the animal's back, flees down the packed street toward the west. A court dignitary's horse trampled a child to death. Her mother seizes a gun and brains him. Shrieks, curses, commands, supplications fill the air. A soldier swings his rifle at Turck who dodges, but the gun strikes Victory from the horse. Turck leaps after her. the Soldier seizes the horse and rides away. Turck drags Victory back into the stables.

EXT - STABLES - DAY
Victory and Turck watch the surging throng without.

TURCK:

We cannot escape now. I almost lost you out there. I'll never leave you again.

The press of blacks thin. The sounds of battle rage upon the eastern side of the city and the population flew toward the west. More and more uniformed soldiers appear among the fleeing throng, until, toward the last, the street is packed with them. It is no orderly retreat, but a rout, complete and terrible.

EXT - STREET - DAY
The fighting steadily approaches, until the crack of rifles sound in the street. Then come a handful of brave men--a little rear guard backing slowly toward the west, working their smoking rifles in feverish haste as they fire volley after volley at the foe. But the soldiers are pressed back until the first line of the enemy comes opposite the stable door. They are men of medium height, with olive complexions and almond eyes. They are well uniformed and superbly armed, and they fight bravely and under perfect discipline. The fight passes on out of sight.

INT - STABLES - DAY
Turck slips toward the door. No one is in sight. A Chinese OFFICER, 30, peers around the corner behind Turck and Victory. He motions to his squad who deploy quietly. Turck hears a slight noise and stiffens. The officer gives a signal. The squad snaps up their rifles and cover Turck.

OFFICER

Drop your weapon or we will kill you.

Turck rises with his hands up. Outside a gun fires. Everyone jumps. Victory raises her gun and shoots. One of the soldiers shoots her. Turck leaps on her.

TURCK:

Victory! No!

Turck hugs her body to him. Fade to black.

INT - HOSPITAL - DAY
Victory lies pale and still on the bed. Turck kneels beside her and holds her hand, his head buried in the mattress. Victory stirs and wakes.

VICTORY:

Jefferson.

TURCK:

Victory! oh, Victory. I had lost hope you would come to.

VICTORY:

Where am I?

TURCK:

You are in a hospital, a place of healing. You were shot in the stable.

VICTORY:

It must be painful to be shot in the stable. I hurt all over.

Turck is about to speak again when the door opens and a DOCTOR, 50, comes in.

DOCTOR

I see our patient is awake. How are you feeling today?

VICTORY:

I hurt and I am hungry.

DOCTOR

We'll see about some food soon but first there is someone who would like to see you.

He steps aside as a regal oriental, The EMPEROR OF CHINA, 45, steps in followed by several people including Delcarte and Taylor.

TURCK:

Delcarte, Taylor! I thought you dead. How did you survive?

Turck crosses to them and hugs them.

DELCARTE:

Please, captain. Comport yourself. We jumped off the launch when bullets began to hit the chemical fuel tank. When it blew we swam away. We made a raft and sailed downstream. The Abyssinians captured us and sent us east to New Gondar, but our convoy was captured before we even reached the city. It took a lot for us to make them believe we were Pan-Americans

TAYLOR

They set aside a comfortable house for us, and furnished us with servants and with money, and in other ways showed us every attention and kindness.

Delcarte and Taylor suddenly realize who is with them and suddenly fall silent.

EMPEROR

Please, continue. I understand what it is to meet friends thought long dead.

TURCK:

Who may I ask are you?

TAYLOR

Ix-nay, Aptain-cay. He's the emperor of China.

TURCK:

Your pardon, Your majesty.

EMPEROR OF CHINA

And who is this lady?

TURCK:

Victory is Queen of England.

EMPEROR OF CHINA

I am not surprised. In our recent explorations in ancient Russia we have found many descendants of the old nobility and royalty. From one head of state to another, We give you Welcome to the Empire of China, Your Majesty. We also regret you were injured in the siege of Moscow, which you knew as New Gondar. Please accept our humble apologies for the pain our soldiers have caused you..

VICTORY:

Thank you.

EMPEROR OF CHINA

I am most curious about the state of modern Pan-America. Even though I, personally, deplore the existence of the strict regulations which have raised a barrier between the east and the west, I felt, as had my predecessors, that recognition of the wishes of the great Pan-American federation would be most conducive to the continued peace of the world. However that is at an end. My empire includes all of Asia, and the islands of the Pacific as far east as 175dW. The empire of Japan no longer exists, having been conquered and absorbed by China over a hundred years ago. The Philippines are well administered, and constitute one of the most progressive colonies of the Chinese empire. The building of this great empire and the spreading of enlightenment among its diversified and savage peoples has required all the best efforts of nearly two hundred years. Upon my accession to the throne I found the labor well nigh perfected and turned my attention to the reclamation of Europe. My ambition is to wrest it from the hands of the blacks, and then to attempt the work of elevating its fallen peoples to the high estate from which the Great War precipitated them.

TURCK:

Who was victorious in that war?

EMPEROR OF CHINA

Pan-America, perhaps, and China, with the blacks of Abyssinia. Those who did not fight were the only ones to reap any of the rewards that are supposed to belong to victory. The combatants reaped naught but annihilation. You have seen--better than any man you must realize that there was no victory for any nation embroiled in that frightful war.

TURCK:

When did it end?

EMPEROR OF CHINA

It has not ended yet. There has never been a formal peace declared in Europe. After a while there were none left to make peace, and the rude tribes which sprang from the survivors continued to fight among themselves because they knew no better condition of society. War razed the works of man--war and pestilence razed man.

TAYLOR

God give that there shall never be such another war!

DELCARTE:

Amen.

EMPEROR OF CHINA

You will be happy to hear that we have been in touch with the leaders of Pan-America. You have been cleared of all charges against you for going beyond Thirty. Indeed, your leaders have appointed you to be the ambassador to the court of the Empire of China.

TURCK:

I am honored. I could ask for nothing more.

VICTORY:

And what about me? What do I get?

TURCK:

What do you need?

VICTORY:

You. Will you be my consort?

TURCK:

In my country, it is usual for the man to ask.

VICTORY:

Will you ask?

TURCK:

Will you answer? Will you marry me?

VICTORY:

Yes and yes.

TURCK:

(hugging Victory) I have been through much--I have suffered much, but I have won two great laurel wreaths beyond thirty. One is the opportunity to rescue Europe from barbarism, the other is a little barbarian, and the greater of these is--Victory.

FADE TO BLACK